EducationWellness

The “What’s next?” question has been trending lately. I hear it every day from myself, I hear it frequently from my friends who have just graduated from college and are deciding what their next adventure will be, and I hear it occasionally from my curious parents.

There’s a familiar déjà vu to this question, and I recently realized it’s because I remembered hearing it all the time when I was about to graduate from high school (maybe even more so than when I was about to graduate from college). It’s the ultimate “transition question.”

When I was eighteen and still deciding what to do with my life, being asked “what’s next” used to bother me. I was so concentrated on giving people the “correct” answer and validating a decision I hadn’t even made yet.

This question has begun is popping up again and I’ve decided that I need to shift my perspective. Instead of feeling limited and rushed by the question, I’m trying to let it guide and focus me. I might not owe myself the perfect answer, but I owe it to myself to put in the effort to figure out the next step out.

Figuring out the next step has meant looking at all possible options. What can I do now?

Volunteer

If you have enough money saved and are figuring out what to do, consider what activities and groups you gave your time to without getting anything in return except enjoyment. Did you work at an animal shelter? Help feed the homeless? These might be passions of yours and great stepping-stones for deciding what your next chapter will be.

Travel

If you’ve never had the opportunity to study abroad or travel for any other reason, now is the time! You’re less likely to have permanent responsibilities that motivate you to stay in one place. Traveling might be the best way to cleanse your life palate and inspire you to make your next leap of faith.

Apply (and apply and apply and apply) for jobs

It’s easy to get discouraged. Remember when you were applying for part time jobs in high school and then to different colleges and again for internships during the summer? Applying doesn’t get easier, but you can get better at it. Grab your old resumes and spruce them up. Use old cover letters to refresh your memory. Talk to peers and teachers about opportunities they might know about. Make Google and The Muse your best friend. You have the tools in front of them – utilize them and don’t stop until you have offers coming at you!

Write

Where you’re starting a journal or a diary or a blog, just write. Write things down so that 1) you can get all those emotions of being free but lost out on paper 2) you can document this amazing time in life and read back and remember it all. When you use writing as an outlet you never know who might be reading.

Return to your roots

Don’t be ashamed or afraid to go home. It’s not taboo. I repeat, it is not taboo. If you’re fortunate enough to have a home to return to when you’re finished with school or in a transition period, throw that into the opportunity pot. You never know how your new brain and new eyes might interpret a place you once thought you knew perfectly. Just like you, other places and other people grow and develop. Don’t ignore that growth.

Continue your education

If you feel like you’re not done with school, don’t be. There are so many things you can do and sometimes having that degree can catapult you to the next level. Whether you’re aiming for med school, law school, business school, clown school, the sky’s the limit.

Start something

Just like traveling, right now might be the time to take a huge risk. If you haven’t found a job yet or you’re in between gigs, take advantage of this open time and make something you wish you’d had growing up or start something you really could use.

Reconnect

Chances are you have a friend or two from your past that you haven’t seen or spoken to in a while. While this might be the most informal idea on this list, it’s still a great reminder to utilize the network you’ve built throughout your life. When people propel in different directions you never know what kind of golden nuggets they might be able to offer you (or that you can offer them!) when you reconnect.

It’s up to you what to do next, just like it’s up to me. The trick (and sometimes the hardest part) is to just do something, even if it means going to the gym regularly or pursuing an interest. Motivate yourself through action and you’re bound to land someplace good. So, what’s next?

Image: Jay Mantri

LearnSkills

Procrastination is that bittersweet friend of yours who dumps you when you need him or her the most. It is not the act of procrastinating per se that is most troubling. Delaying assignments by using Snapchat or watching cat videos is quite enjoyable. It is what happens ‘after’ that leaves us at our wits’ end. It leaves us with more worries, more stress, and more workload. Can this be contained? Yes, of course. Here are a few effective tactics you may use to do so.

1. Break the Bulk

Overwhelming work is a driving force for procrastination. Hence it would be in your best interest to break the workload into smaller components. For example, if you have a large project that needs to be completed, divide your work into sub sections such as Introduction, Topic 1, Topic 2, etc. This way it will be easier to digest how much work you have and you will be far more motivated to complete your tasks.

2. Set Artificial Deadlines

Deadlines help us keep pace. Our working senses get activated when we have a near deadline looming over our heads. Making your own deadlines before the actual deadline is a good way to get you on your feet. But they would be void without incentive. Make a penalty for not following deadlines and reward yourself for completing tasks on time. Make sure to not reward yourself too heavily, for you will get carried away and miss your next deadline.

3. Alternate Your Tasks

Boredom is procrastination’s best source of fuel. Don’t stick to one task as it will soon become tedious and the distractions around you will suddenly become more inviting. Alternating your tasks will keep you focused. I mix dull tasks with enjoyable ones to complete my work faster and more efficiently.

4. Stay in a Conducive Environment

Make sure you’re in an environment that is conducive to completing work. This entails doing work free of distractions. In my own experience, I switch off the Internet modem whenever I have homework to avoid WiFi-related distractions. Having friends who are motivated and supportive also helps. They will push you back on the right track when you feel like quitting. Tell your friends about all of your goals so that you become more accountable to fulfilling them.

How do you tackle procrastination?

Image: Jan Vašek

Health

Have you ever come across that person who is always complaining, gossiping, or making negative comments? Before identifying him or her, it can be very difficult to stay away from responding with negativity. Negative people like negative company. Constantly dealing with people who bring negativity into your life or who never fail to bring you down in some way are the kinds of people you should consider weeding out of your life. If these are people you ultimately can’t escape, there are ways to distance yourself without being harsh or rude.

Law of Attraction

The law of attraction notes that “likes attract likes” and if you focus on positive thoughts you will find yourself with a positive outcome. Now, consider applying this concept in another form. If you openly display certain qualities or interests, you are likely to attract people who are also interested in those same things. This, after discerning that you want to surround yourself with new people, is the first step of attracting people who are likely to understand you and who share similar traits.

Farewell to Your Comfort Zone

This one is difficult but very important. Many of us do not enjoy leaving our comfort zones because, well, it is no longer a comfortable place. However, leaving your comfort zone is the only way to achieve goals and stand out from the conventional – it is vital in life. It also allows you to get comfortable with what was once uncomfortable, therefore making your life a constant cycle that pushes you to try new things. Try joining a new club, traveling somewhere with a program, sitting somewhere else for lunch, or even inviting people you’ve never spent time with (outside of school or work) for lunch. Branching out is essential in trying to make new relationships.

Make Time for Yourself

Aside from trying out new activities, having some time for yourself is also an important component to this transformative time in your life. Allowing yourself to think alone and reflect on your experiences will bring you to identify the parts of your life you wish to alter. It allows you to make calm, well thought out decisions.

Focus on Work or School

Focusing on work or school is a great way to concentrate on the things that are important. In addition, it only leaves time for few people which allows you realize that quality time is meant for quality people. This is an easier method for not only distancing yourself from negative people, but it is also a great way to appreciate the people who matter most in your life.

Start Acting Positive

Almost like my law of attraction point, you can attract positive people if you begin to act positive. After you hear the typical, “I hate Monday, I wish it were Friday,” you can either not respond to it by changing the topic or you can respond with positivity by noting, “Really? I don’t mind them – they’re like any other day.” Like I previously mentioned, negative people like to feed off of other negative people. You will be surprised as to how quickly people will begin to catch on to this mindset. Being positive can: 1. Help positivity flourish in those around you, and 2. Repel negative people. Both of these are helpful for achieving your goal.

Staying positive is not only a mood booster, but it is also necessary for your physical health. Do yourself a favor and begin changing the parts of your life that will help you become a better person. The steps may be unfamiliar but you can’t go wrong in trying!

How do you add positivity into your life?

P.S. Journaling and living inside out can also help you live a more positive life.

Image: Bảo-Quân Nguyễn

CultureHealth

You know that moment during a meal when everyone is pleasantly full after finishing their entree, just before someone reluctantly reminds the table the restaurant is closing soon so it’s time to sign the check? That soul-warming instant when conversation flows effortlessly? This moment has a name. Sobremesa (n.) is a Spanish word meaning, “the time spent around the table after dinner, talking to the people you shared the meal with; time to digest and savor both food and friendship.” This word is the essence of why in an over stimulated, hectic world, it’s so important to make time to gather around a table for meals.

While I admit my love for the sobremesa is partially because I am a certified foodie, it’s even more so because the Sobremesa is a time for true conversation, an art seemingly dwindling in our generation. We are so used to texting and Facebook messaging entire conversations, that it’s easy to forget how beneficial face-to-face conversation is. While you might feel you know someone well, a deeper realm of connection opens upon seeing facial expressions, gestures, and all the multifaceted characteristics of speaking in real life.

There have been numerous studies detailing the benefits of “table time” in families and in any type of relationship. According to Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology and countless other sources, table time strengthens solidarity in relationships (families, friends, sports teams, roommates, and so on), alleviates stress, improves conversation skills, encourages healthier eating, and broadens intellectual horizons by sharing and listening to different perspectives. All this while possibly exploring new cuisines!

At least once a month, my roommates and I plan a “roomie dinner” where we each pitch in to help; someone purchases ingredients, another provides his/her cooking skills, and another roommate sets the table and helps clean. We gather around the table, leaving all school and life-related stresses at our desks for a few hours to simply enjoy each other’s company. Most dinners, we will choose a meal theme – anything from Mexican to Italian cuisine. Here are a couple of our favorite dishes:

In college, it is easy to get used to eating quick meals while watching Hulu between classes or meetings. I challenge you, however, to take a break. Carve out a few hours of your time and experience just how restorative and forever calming a dinner and its Sobremesa are for the soul.

Image: FoodiesFeed

Skills

I pride myself on being punctual, even if I am not always able to achieve that. That is because showing up on time is very easy to do but not always accomplished. Think of how easily you can impress someone just by being prompt. Here are some things to think about concerning your own punctuality.

Punctuality Is A Sign Of Respect

Being fashionably late is cool for a reason, right? It can seem that way but that is because it sends a message. That message can be good or bad. Being late in a professional situation says that your time is somehow more valuable than everyone else’s time. Even in a school setting, showing up late tends to affect your grade. Some teachers say that every time someone comes in late, it distracts from the lesson. It seems silly but if every single person is late, it could have a large consequence. In a practical sense, you are getting less work done if you are late. In a larger sense, arriving on time says that you respect someone enough not to waste their time. That message can be invaluable.

Lack Of Punctuality Signals That You Are Irresponsible

I know there are a lot of reasons that you could be late. Maybe your car wouldn’t start or you got into an accident. Anyone can forgive these individual occurrences. One time events likely won’t hurt you in the long run. The real trouble is serial lateness. You cannot claim to be stuck in traffic everyday. If traffic is a big problem for you, you can start leaving earlier. We must all find a way to remove the obstacles that are keeping us from succeeding. There is no need to always be a step behind everyone else.

Don’t Be The Flaky Friend

Your friends and family love you. They don’t hold you to the same standards that work or school might. You don’t have to be perfect all the time. You probably even have friends who don’t care at all when you’re late. It is still important to think about how your actions are affecting others. Your family may worry about you if they have no idea where you are. On the other hand, they might find you unreliable because they never know when you will show up for them. This is all easily fixed just by showing up on time.

Try To Forgive Those Who Are Late

I know I’ve written a lot about why you shouldn’t be late. That said, even though it can be annoying when others are late, try to think of what they might be going through. We never completely know someone else’s situation. It is better to see someone late than not see them at all.

Try to be punctual because it shows others that you value them. Don’t make excuses to keep a bad habit. Learn to improve. Just remember to be kind to others, because every situation is different.

Image: Flickr

Skills

Today you and I both made a decision. Thus far, today’s decisions have included my choosing to ignore my first alarm clock and wait for the next preset one three minutes later, running a red light while squealing in bliss guilt, and noteworthy progress in my decision to study abroad in Budapest. We are all aware that the decisions we make every day can either be major or minor and the more decisions we make, the more productive we are. And since they are a part of our daily lives, we must learn how to situate ourselves in a position that allows us to make the best decisions we can. Here are a few tips that may help!

1. Objectivity

Emotions take a huge part in our moods and sometimes, our decisions. This can many times fog what is really at stake. The best decisions are those made when there are no judgments or biases and when one is not in a position when his or her emotions are not heavily influencing the choices made. Making decisions in an emotional state may lead to regret later on. Try finding an outlet for emotions elsewhere and later returning to make a decision in a more rational state.

2. Take Your Precious Time

Quick means productive this day and age, and meeting deadlines means efficiency. However, in decision-making, especially with big ones, it is important to fully think out what it is you are choosing to do. More importantly, this means not rushing to conclusions and basing choices off of assumptions. Taking the time to fully analyze the possibilities is the best way to get results. If this means taking an extra day or two to take a look at things with a fresh mind, make arrangements and things will surely fall into place. It is better to take your time than to make hasty and rash decisions.

3. 360˚ POV

Although you may like to think you’re right most of the time, listening to all parts of the story, putting yourself in the shoes of others, and looking at all points of views help you rethink your position. Make sure that when making decisions, you are taking into consideration multiple points of view. This will allow you to see your potential paths. Not only will this call for smarter decisions, but it will also make for more confident ones.

4. Follow Your Gut

I’ve discerned that hunches are often underrated and overlooked. Many celebrities and successful businessmen have thanked their achievements to following their gut. There is a common misconception that “following your gut” means do what you feel, which is very much linked with emotions. However, there is a stark difference between the two. Following your gut is equivalent to following your instinct, which is very different than doing what your emotions want. As noted by Lisa Evans, a writer for Entrepreneur, you can verify if your choices are coming from emotion if you are feeling stressed, anxious, or worried. If not, then you are following your gut, which is something innate in all humans.

5. Make a List

How to not over-analyze? Although everyone says to never over-analyze a situation, they are, regrettably, inevitable sometimes. So, if you happen to be someone of this nature, the best way to structure your “over-analyzing” is by making a list. Jot down all of the pros and cons of making whatever decision you plan on taking and compare. Which makes more sense? Which is common sense? Which has more cons? Writing things down helps with objectivity and seeing things in another form.

Making decisions are a required part of our lives and sometimes making the right ones can be tricky. Hopefully you can find yourself embracing a few of these tips when in a dilemma. How will you approach your next decision?

Image: Julia Mazerova

EducationSkills

“Hide not your talents, they for use were made, what’s a sundial in the shade?” – Benjamin Franklin

Think of the most successful people you know. Some may come with a fancy job title or an impressive LinkedIn profile, but what is certain among the very successful are these three things: they excel at what they do, are established in their chosen field of interest, and seek constant growth.  Now it’s up to you how you measure success, but in this millennial age there is no doubt that happiness and purpose must coincide with any sort of big career move. This is difficult at times being in a world that says good grades and a steadfast work ethic are still not enough to break through an industry. There are many people out there with extreme creativity or academic dedication or innovative mindsets who are all suffering from an epidemic of untapped potential. One defining factor between the successful and the almost-there is the proper use of one’s talents. Those people who have made it, they are the ones who have realized and utilized their unique skills. It is possible, dear friends, to become the person that other people refer to upon hearing the word “successful.” Understanding and using your talents could be your gateway into finding the cross-section of work and passion. But first, let’s go over two common and very unfortunate misconceptions:

  1. I don’t have any talents.
  2. I do have talents, but they are useless.

People must be able to surpass these ideas and realize that everyone is talented and there are practical ways to make talents relevant. We’re not talking about the whistling or saying the alphabet backwards kind of talent (though do keep those in your back pocket, countless dinner parties await you), but rather, the particular skills and capacities that are transferable into your everyday ventures.

The search is on: Discover & Develop

Everyone is bent a certain way and because of this, we each fit into our own niches in life. The crucial first step in engaging your talents is to find them. Here are a few thoughts to ponder to start your very own talent search:

  • What’s something that you find yourself thinking about and getting lost in thought?
  • What activities do you excel in or wish to excel in?

Being able to answer these questions may help you pinpoint certain interests that you can develop through practice. One of the best books about unlocking creativity is Austin Kleon’s “Steal Like an Artist.” As an artist and New York Times Bestselling author, he advises his readers to “write what you like” and “not what you know” and emphasizes the importance of everyone having side projects. Hobbies and side projects are the best ways to foster your interests and ultimately serve as tangible examples of your talents. Whether you are into photography, calligraphy, producing music, planning events, coding, blogging, analyzing movies, or whatever it may be, dedicate time to produce that kind of work. As Kleon says, “Take time to mess around. Get Lost. Wander. You never know where it’s going to lead you.”

Real use in real time: Harness & Employ

Sometimes people have talents that directly align with their studies and jobs. Sometimes they don’t. Either way, it is important to utilize them. Once you have identified your talents, spend time to create ways to share them with the world. Perhaps those photos you take on the side are the mere start of your traveling photography blog. Maybe your love for getting people together will allow you to start your company’s first-ever social retreat to boost employee engagement. With so many channels of communication through social media, everyone has the chance to appeal to the masses. Let your ideas be heard and create teams of people who share the same interests. Kickstarter.com is the world’s largest funding platform in which people can promote their ideas for a product or project to the public, gaining an audience and financial backing. It is a gold mine for ideas and the talented people behind them. It takes courage and planning to bring your talents to the forefront of situations, but allow yourself to create opportunities that not only welcome your talents but require them. You can be the person who has that certain skill, that particular edge that is needed for an upcoming project.

Today is the day to spend time with your talents and make something real with them. Sir Ken Robinson once said, “A strong passion allied with even a moderate talent, will generally get you further than a strong talent with little enthusiasm.” Translation: As long as you work with joy and resilience, there really is no stopping you.

Image: Ali Inay

HealthSkills

Maybe you’re having a bad day or maybe even a bad week. It can be hard to stay positive when life just seems as though it isn’t ever going to go your way, but here are some tricks to keeping an optimistic mind!

1. Reminders

Having inspirational and motivational quotes as a daily reminder to maintain a positive attitude can be extremely helpful! Whether that’s putting Post-It notes on your mirror that you can look at as you get ready in the morning or having an alert on your phone for a middle of the day pick-me-up, adding positive sayings to your daily routine can brighten your day!

2. Exercise

Exercise is proven to make us happier. Not only does it relieve stress, but the results of exercise cause us to feel better about ourselves on the inside and outside, giving us a feeling of accomplishment and an attitude that wants to accomplish more!

3. Your Diet

Yes, that chocolate cake may give us temporary happiness, but eating healthy has a similar effect on us as exercising! Taking care of ourselves on the inside makes us feel better on the outside and gives us a more positive outlook!

4. Socialize

Spending time with people will boost your mood as well. We love to be around company, and being around others to talk and laugh with is an easy way to put a little pep into your step.

5. Surround Yourself with Positive People

If you’re with people who have a positive outlook on life, it will help you to do the same. Being around negative people can cause us to be negative as well. Of course, it’s important to be there for your friends, but being around people who are negative 24/7 will only do harm to yourself.

6. Take Time for Yourself

Take time for your own hobbies and interests. Try learning a new song on the guitar or pick up the book that’s been sitting on your bedside table. As important as it is to be around other people, it’s just as important to take time to do the things you love.

7. Pamper Yourself

Sometimes a thing as simple as changing out of your pajamas and putting on a pair of jeans and a cute shirt can boost your mood. If you look good, you feel good. Feeling put together on the outside makes us feel put together in other aspects of our life and gives us the boost of confidence we need to conquer other activities.

Image: unsplash

CultureEducationInspiration

We’ve all been there. We’re checking our phones before we go to sleep, in the middle of the night, and as soon as we wake up. We glance at our phones to see if we have any new emails or text messages even when there isn’t an alert or notification. We send texts, scroll through Instagram, read new status updates on Facebook, and get lost in the black hole that is Reddit. From our waking moment until shut-eye, we live a good portion of our day through small screens. It’s easy to get burned out from technology and the constant access to one another. The information available is overwhelming, and technology never sleeps. It is a 24/7 beast that never loosens its grip, that is, until you make it. This leads us to our trick that has helped us recharge when we feel consumed by cell phones, apps, laptops, tablets, and other gadgets that have monopolized our attention.

The trick to recharge yourself is to unplug. Unplug from the constant communication and attention hog that is technology. Obviously we’re not saying to give technology up forever, but press those ‘Off’ buttons on your laptop, cell phones, tablets, and other gadgets you might use, for an afternoon, an evening, or even for an entire day! Without distractions in the form of buzzing, beeping, and red flashing lights, you can actually enjoy the present moment and let your mind power down for a short while. To unplug, simply switch the off buttons on your devices, put them in a drawer or another room (out of sight, out of mind), and plan activities that will keep you active and away from technology. When you allow yourself to step away from being constantly accessible, give yourself more ‘you’ time, and choose to engage in-person rather than on text or Instagram, you’ll feel recharged and ready to go.

Besides recharging and preventing burnout, here are some more examples of great benefits of unplugging if you still aren’t convinced to give up your iPhone for a couple of hours:

More You Time

Instead of spending most of your time reacting to phone alerts, use your time to focus on yourself. Maybe that involves going for a jog, listening to music, cooking, reading, or just catching up on some much needed zzz’s. Listen to your body and give yourself more ‘you’ time.

Build In-Person Relationships

A TIME mobility poll showed that 17% of all poll respondents said they check their phone at every meal regardless of whom they’re dining with. Instead of being distracted and glued to who is trying to reach you by phone, pay attention to the people physically around you. Get to know people in-person rather than through text. These relationships you build face-to-face will be much more valuable than the ones you build online.

Feel Less Stressed

You hear a buzz or beep and immediately reach for your phone. Whether it’s an email or a text, you might feel the need to respond to someone or take care of the issue immediately. If multiple texts or emails come in, there are more responsibilities now added to your plate. The stress and to-dos add up quickly.

Experience the Present

You’ve seen others do it and you’ve done it yourself: walking and texting. When you walk and text or just spend a lot of time on technology in general, you miss out on the amazing things happening around you. You miss the beauty of a flower garden, a potential new friend walking by, and awe-inspiring architecture. When you need directions, instead of asking someone for help and engaging with another human, it has become far too easy to use an app to locate your Point B. Join and experience the present sans technology, and who knows what you’ll see and discover.

Sleep Better

Try sleeping with your phone not next to your head. Instead, charge your phone in the kitchen or bathroom. This way you won’t be tempted to roll over in the middle of the night and check your text messages. This might also help prevent your phone from being the last thing you see before you get some shut eye. Furthermore, the light from phones and laptop screens affects the production of melatonin, the sleep-inducing hormone, in our bodies. In turn, your sleep will be delayed and you will feel tired, cranky, and unproductive the next day.

Be Happier

Live your own life. Stop comparing your life to the highlight reel that you see on your friends’ news feeds and statuses. Remember that people post only the best photos and updates on their profiles, and what you see are edited and curated portions of their life. You’re not seeing what’s behind-the-scenes. Social media can make us feel lonely and jealous, both of which do not make us happier. When you experience the present and stop living your life through your screens, you will feel happier.

Be More Productive

Without the constant distraction of technology, information, and communication, you just might get more done. Unplug so you don’t have to worry about multitasking or responding to anyone. Focus on your tasks. When you don’t have beeps and buzzes pulling your attention in other directions, you will accomplish more.

Have you ever tried unplugging for an afternoon?

EducationSkills

As the sunny season approaches many students translate the word “summer’ directly into “intern season.” The narrative surrounding the months of June to August is usually accompanied by questions like “Where are you interning?” and “Who are you working for?” The stress of feeling like you should have answers to these questions can be overwhelming. But the social and professional pressure to be part of this dialogue is – in my opinion – slightly ridiculous and highly unrealistic. Here are some logistical facts about being an intern:

  • Interning is expensive. On top of having to pay for housing fees, appropriate work attire, transportation, and food, interns typically work for a very small stipend or no money at all (or in some cases they have to work for school credit which can actually cost them additional academic fees). And these are just a few of major financial costs associated with being an intern.
  • Interning is time consuming. Whether you are a part-time or full-time intern, the tasks you are likely doing at this entry level, correlated to the amount of time you spend doing them, often don’t match up on at a quality to quantity comparison.
  • Interning is stressful (for the worst reasons). While I won’t deny altogether that professional growth is, in fact, an important and positive part of personal development, I will stand firm in saying that interning can often lead to copious amounts of unnecessary stress. Because so many people hold their internships up high like a shiny prize they have won, the atmosphere can be tense, uncomfortable, and entirely career-oriented. Rather than viewing internships as ways to learn new and interesting things about a specialty you might be interested in perusing, this dog-eat-dog environment tends to put more emphasis on whether or not a full time position will be offered at the end of it all.

Carpe wants to tell you “No internship? No problem.” In fact, you might be in a better position than your peers, and here’s why:

  • You aren’t bound to a formal time schedule. Without a permanent 7 am wake up time you are free to create a time structure that works best for your own personality and productivity. If you prefer to stay up late working on a personal project versus getting up before the sun rises, you have that option too.
  • You have flexibility when it comes to traveling. Summer is a wonderful time to travel and with a more flexible schedule you can plan a trip during off-peak seasons. That means you save money and can plan to visit friends or family at a time when they can actually host you.
  • You have time to explore a personal passion or interest. If you aren’t interning or working you should definitely be doing something productive on the personal side. Whether that includes writing, drawing, surfing, knitting, learning a new language; it’s up to you – the sky is the limit. This is the only time when all of your other responsibilities aren’t piled on your plate, so optimize every minute!
  • You get to take time for yourself. Sometimes the most important aspect of not having a formal internship is that you get to take time to be alone with yourself. You get to focus entirely on how are you doing mentally, physically, and emotionally. It is difficult to assess how the last year went if you move onto the next step too quickly. Taking time to really check-in an think about what makes sense going forward can really help bring you to the next phase of your life in a thoughtful and internally motived rather than hasty and pressured way.

Whatever you choose to do, do it to its fullest potential. You have the ability to make every day count, so whether you’re interning for your state representative or spending the summer in Cascade, Idaho backpacking and kayaking, invest fully and know that you’re doing just fine. In fact, you’re doing great.

 

What are you doing this summer? Let us know @CarpeJuvenis!

Image courtesy of Unsplash.