EducationSkills

The spring semester is going to start soon, and for some, it already has. Many of you might be considering doing internships this semester. A while ago, I did a piece about the end of summer internships. This one is about the beginning of spring ones! Here are a few things to keep in mind while preparing and applying to spring semester internships, especially in large cities.

Research.

Think about what type of internship you want to do. Social media, computer science, photography, editorial, public relations, you name it. Do you want to work on something in your field of study, or are you considering trying something new? What do internships tend to require? Experience in certain programs, making tweets, or proofreading? This will help you in your search and it will help you with preparing your resume and cover letter later on. Since you’re in a city, you want to make sure that you also open minded to start­-ups, places outside of your borough or local area, and positions that overlap. You also have to consider whether something is paid or not, if there is credit, and if the two -hour commute is worth it. Can you fit it into your schedule?

“Stalk.”

Said my professor. Yes, you spend a lot of time on the computer when you’re thinking about internships, and a lot of it is clicking around. Once you have an idea of what you want to do and a few companies for which you want to work, you should Google them. For example, if you want to write for a magazine, look up the editors. Look at the company’s mission statement and branch. Find the Twitter or LinkedIn or company website. This way, you will know a bit about the company but also a bit about who you will be working under. At first, back in my freshmen days, I was unsure about this, but multiple professors and people who work have told me it is definitely normal (and even expected) so no worries. You can go take a look at where the office is and see if the neighborhood is somewhere you would be willing to spend your time in. Can you buy lunch somewhere nearby? Is there a train station nearby? What kind of people are walking around? Casual younger people or older people in suits? You’ll be among them.

Create.

Create your persona. Make or edit your resume to suit your needs. Design it so it somehow represents who you are and how you work. Design interns design their resumes to be unique, but multi-­colored resumes wouldn’t work for a finance intern. Check your social media to make sure it is consistent. Get some appropriate clothes for the interview. You don’t have to wear black heels through a snowstorm or a suit in the summer, but make sure your nails are clean, your hair is washed, and your bag is suitable to both hold copies of your resume while looking appropriate for the office.

If you’re in a large city, you might want to consider adding some flair to your outfit so you can stand out. You’ll be competing with all the other university students (as well as people who have already graduated). The fashion interns I’ve met have been pretty unique, but not office appropriate. Again, this is where your research comes in! Maybe that’s alright for where you’re applying for. This preparation helps with interview questions that range from “Why do you want to work with us?” to “Tell me about yourself.”

Getting an internship, especially in big cities, can be pretty difficult. It starts out slow, but once you have a foundation, it becomes easier. It can be scary and it’s definitely competitive, but all of that becomes easier to deal with with practice. When something doesn’t work, try and try again. Best of luck!

Image: Chris Isherwood

CultureEducation

Happy summer! Now that the school year is over for several months, it’s time to kick back and read the books you’ve had to put off for essays and exams. Whether you’re on an airplane, on the beach, or in a cozy chair next to the window, pick up one of these summer reads and enjoy! P.S. Did you have a chance to read any books off of the spring reading list?

1. My Salinger Year by Joanna Rakoff

We can’t get enough of memoirs, and this one looks juicy and captivating. Rakoff recalls her experiences in New York City working for J.D. Salinger. We bet this story will be captivating from the first page to the last.

2. The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

We’ve seen this book around for a while but have yet to read it. This story about six teenagers at a summer camp for the arts and how they grow into middle age looks like a great slice-of-life novel. We’re excited to see how these six friendships change as life progresses, especially through the complexities of each character.

3. The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown

Talk about an inspiring read. The Boys in the Boat tells the story of nine Americans and their quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. We love stories about beating the odds, hard work, perseverance, and true grit.

4. How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg

It doesn’t matter if you love math or hate math. How Not to Be Wrong shows us how math is intertwined with everything we do with a fascinating perspective. With chapters like “What to Expect When You’re Expecting to Win the Lottery” and “Dead Fish Don’t Read Minds,” color us intrigued. Math may not have been our strongest subject in high school, but we have a feeling we might start to like it now.

5. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars is the story about a wealthy family who meets on their private island every summer. A book appropriate for summer, this book has suspense, true love, and a gripping plot. Sounds good to us!

We’d love to know, what are you reading this summer?

CultureEducation

Now that fall and winter have passed, it’s time for a spring cleaning! That means our bookshelves are getting a makeover. There are lots of great books coming out this spring, and we can’t wait to dive in! The hardest question is which one to read first. This spring we are looking for some inspiring reads that will motivate us and help carry us through to summer, where there is no homework, exciting travel plans, more time to volunteer, and when senioritis is relieved. These are the books we are reading this spring…

1. The Promise of a Pencil by Adam Braun

Do you dream of starting your own non-profit? Do you want to help others in the world? How about just be inspired to find your calling? Adam Braun shares his personal experience of how he started Pencils of Promise in this bestseller. Braun shares his lessons learned along the way so that you, too, can follow your passion and make a difference. P.S. Read our interview with Adam here!

2. I Am That Girl: How to Speak Your Truth, Discover Your Purpose, and #bethatgirl by Alexis Jones

What’s your passion or purpose in this world? Alexis Jones inspires people to dream bigger and leave the world a better place. You are good enough and you don’t need to be perfect, whatever ‘perfect’ means. We’re excited to be empowered!

3. I Just Graduated…Now What? by Katherine Schwarzenegger

Are you graduating or did you just graduate? Are you tired of being asked what you want to do with the rest of your life? Katherine Schwarzenegger interviews awesome people about how they felt when they had just graduated from college. This should be an inspiring read.

4. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

This 1967 coming-of-age classic is a great novel to re-read several times, and it tells the story of two rival groups – the Greasers and the Socs. S.E. Hinton started writing the novel when she was just fifteen-years-old, and the final book was published when she was eighteen. Pretty incredible. Having read this book in high school, it will be a nice refresher to re-read and get lost in the world of Ponyboy Curtis.

5. Zen and the Art of Happiness by Chris Prentiss

Change the way you look at situations so that you can see them in a positive light. This book should be a breeze to get through, while being powerful and life changing at the same time.

What’s on your bookshelf this spring?

 

Uncategorized

Today, March 20, marks the first day of spring! Spring arrived quickly and without much of a trace, and for most of us it might still feel like winter. The sun staying out later in the evening has been a welcomed change. Now all we need are higher temperatures!

Here’s what we are looking forward to this spring…

blue flowers 2

EducationHigh SchoolTravel

For those of you who are about to embark on spring break or are still anticipating the sweet arrival for a long needed rest, here are some ways to relax while still remaining productive!

1)   Grab your calendar. Spend thirty minutes writing down everything you need to keep track of for the rest of the semester. For example, pull out your classes’ syllabi and mark down when assignments are due and when exams are taking place. Having everything marked visually in one place give you a good sense of what is coming up – stress less and take time for fun!

2)   Volunteer. If you are at home and looking for something to do, consider donating your time to volunteerism. Not only will you be doing good in the neighborhood, but you will have the opportunity to learn something new about your community. Check out Volunteer Match to start helping!

3)   Work out. In between your classes, friends, exams, homework, eating, sleeping, etc., it can be difficult to find time for exercise. Whether you go on a run, sign up for a trial-period at a nearby gym, or spend an hour outside doing yoga, take some time and sweat it out!

4)   Find a job or internship. This is easier said than done, but with just three months until summer it is a good idea to begin applying within the next few weeks. Websites like Intern Sushi and The Muse are great places to start the hunt!

5)   Rest. Your body needs to rest. Don’t feel bad about sleeping in or taking the mid-day nap you never have time for at school. After midterms your body is likely in need of some rest and relaxation.

If you are going on a trip with friends or family make sure to check out our tips on how to stay safe while traveling and have an awesome break!

 

Image credit: www.2013yearoflettering.tumblr.com

CultureEducationSkills

Love politics, public service, and Washington D.C.? This internship might be perfect for you!

Apply to intern at the White House Internship Program this Summer 2014. Interning at the White House will give you an incredible opportunity to have a hands-on approach to politics, public service, and building your leadership skills. You’ll have to send in essay questions, your one page resume, and letters of recommendation by January 5, 2014. Get started now!

{image via}

Skills

I know, I know – we haven’t even celebrated the holidays (or Thanksgiving!) yet, but now is the time to start thinking about spring and summer internships. While many companies have internship application deadlines just after the New Year, it depends on where you are applying and their rules and requirements. Having all of December to work on your application, essays, resume, and recommendations may seem like a long time, but the time will go by in the blink of an eye. Better to start now and get the ball rolling.

Before you jump into just sending out your information to a bunch of random companies, there are some important things to consider:

  •  Where You Want to Intern

It will be beneficial in the long run to take some time to think about your interests and where you want to intern. What companies have you been interested in, who do you want to learn from, where do you think you can best improve your skills, what company do you think can use your help? Do you want to work for a large corporation or a small start-up? Do you want to intern in your hometown or out of state/country?

  • Resources

Here are a few places that may start generating some ideas about where you might like to intern:

  1. Intern Sushi
  2. Ed2010
  3. Intern Queen
  4. Go to the company of interest’s website, search under Contact or Internships/Jobs (usually at the bottom of the homepage) for more information on how you can apply to work there for the spring or summer.
  •  Essays

Many internship listings will require that you send in writing samples or essays. Brainstorm ideas for the essay questions that are asked, draft up a sample, edit edit edit, and then have someone look over what you’ve written. Your writing represents what you can do and what you will bring to the company, so give these essays your all.

  • Resume

Almost every place you apply to intern will require a resume. Keep your resume to one page and list the most relevant experiences that make sense for the job/internship you want.

  • Letters of Recommendation

Some places will require that you send letters of recommendation as part of your application. If you need letters of recommendation, consider asking your favorite teacher, coach, supervisor or boss at your previous job/internship, or your volunteer supervisor. Ask for letters of recommendation 2-3 weeks in advance, since the person may need time to sit down and write it.

  • Timeline

Schedule out when you plan on completing your application/resume/essays/letters of recommendation so that applying to spring and summer internships don’t interfere too much with your schoolwork. You also want to be sure you are making those deadlines on time! With a little organization and markings on your calendar, you’ll be set.

Good luck and get started!