CultureEducationHealthSkillsTravel

*Background information: The Congressional Award is an award for young Americans (the only award given to youth by Congress), and was established in 1979 by the United States Congress. As a participant in the program, you set and meet goals in four program areas: Voluntary Public Service, Personal Development, Physical Fitness, and Expedition/Exploration. Based on time commitments, you earn Bronze, Silver, and Gold Congressional Award Certificates and Congressional Award Medals.

I first learned about the Congressional Award in 2007. As a junior in high school, I thought that I was already over occupied with activities and volunteering. However, while I was involved in academic and extracurricular activities, I was not setting goals or measuring my achievements in ways that would help me grow and learn more about myself or my community. After learning more about the Congressional Award and realizing what new opportunities and growth I could experience from the program, I recognized that it was never too late to set goals and try new experiences.

The Congressional Award positively impacted my life from day one. From the moment I knew I could be a part of this program, I had no doubt that my life was going to change in a great way. While I have learned many lessons, there are three in particular that stand out the most. The first way the Congressional Award has played a positive role in my life is by allowing me to experience things I never would have otherwise.

For example, for my Gold Medal Exploration, I planned a road trip following the Mormon Trail and the destinations that my great-great-great-great grandfather documented in his journal as he led a wagon train to Salt Lake City, Utah. Through this journey, I learned a great deal about my family history, the difficulties my ancestors faced, and saw parts of the United States I may never have seen without the Congressional Award giving me the motivation and reason to do so.

The second way the Congressional Award has positively influenced my life is that it presented me with the chance to learn more about myself through the process of evaluating my strengths and weaknesses, setting goals, determining steps to make my goals a reality, and to improve upon my previous achievements. As I earned my medals and set new goals for each new level, I had to push myself further than I did before, and being able to self-analyze and learn what I was capable of achieving was eye-opening and critical in my self-growth.

The Congressional Award is an organized journey with the freedom to choose your own paths. It is because of the structure of the program married with the individual choice to decide what activities to be involved in that brings me to the third way my life has been positively influenced. Although participants earn Bronze, Silver, and Gold Medals as an amazing honor for accomplishing goals and hours, for me the program was never about the material achievements, but the personal non-tangible rewards I attained along the way, such as perseverance, dedication, self-motivation, and confidence. There is no question that the Congressional Award has positively influenced me, and it is an experience that has provided endless lessons and will remain a positive force in my life.

Next week, I will be accepting the Congressional Award Gold Medal from members of Congress. I have no idea what is in store, but I’m excited to find out. I will be tweeting updates about the journey via @carpejuvenis, so be sure to follow along! It is an honor to be awarded the Congressional Award Gold Medal, and it will be a very humbling and eye-opening experience.

[The photo above is me receiving the Bronze Congressional Award Medal from Congressman Reichert.]

EducationSkills

Running a 1/2 marathon is equal parts mental and physical endurance. Although I trained for about four solid months (January – April) before ever stepping foot on that race course, the actual event was an entirely different beast. Having never taken part of an athletic activity dedicated solely to running, I wasn’t sure what to expect. In the past I have played tennis and soccer, and I will also admit that I LOVE organized sports of any kind, so this was a brand new challenge for me. I wanted to outline the mental stages I went through during the race – I can still remember specific thoughts very vividly at certain miles so I wanted to share those with you. Looking back I can laugh at some of them and at myself, but when my legs had the chance to stop moving after those 13.1 miles I was most certainly the last one laughing.

I will genuinely say that taking part of this 1/2 marathon was one of the most invigorating experiences I have ever had. It was something I did entirely by myself and for myself. I was also reminded of how fortunate I am to have such an incredible family and network of friends who supported me literally every step of the way. Thank you, thank you, thank you to all of you. I am infinitely lucky to have you in my life. Also thanks to Nike for hosting such a well-planned event that benefited the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.

What is an experience that meant a lot to you? Share it with the Carpe community!

Professional SpotlightSpotlight

Ever since I found out about Birchbox, a monthly subscription beauty sample box, I have been hooked. When I had the opportunity to interview one of the co-founders, Hayley Barna, I jumped at it. Hayley Barna and her business partner, Katia Beauchamp, are inspiring women who have taken the beauty industry by storm. Ambitious, down-to-Earth, and capable, Hayley is not only a lot of fun to talk to, but she is also generous with her advice and knowledge. After years of consulting and working in the corporate world, Hayley made the leap and started her own company (Birchbox), which continues to see amazing success. Read on to learn about how Hayley got to where she is today, her thoughts about business school, and the advice she has for her 20-year-0ld self. You’re going to love and admire her as much as we do!

Name: Hayley Barna
Age: 30
Education: B.A. in Economics from Harvard University; MBA in Business Administration from Harvard Business School
Follow: Hayley’s Twitter / Birchbox

Carpe Juvenis: How do you define ‘Seizing Your Youth’?

Hayley Barna: I don’t know if I think about it as my youth or just seizing every day and making the most of every hour, every week, every year. Starting Birchbox, for example, there was a lot we didn’t know that actually helped us have the ambition to think “we can do this!” I think a lot of that was about being young and not being jaded.

CJ: You attended Harvard University and majored in Economics. How did you determine what to study?

HB: I went to Harvard thinking I was going to be a science major or an engineer. I did science research in high school and I was very into it. I took computer science and economics my first semester of college. I thought the classes were so cool and I loved it, but computer science was not very applied and it didn’t have a lot to do with people. Economics was the mix between left brain and right brain. I took microeconomics first, which was about people, decisions, and real world practicality. I fell in love with economics and stuck with that. I also started taking psychology classes. It was the behavioral aspect of economics that I really focused on.

CJ: How did you make the decision to go to Harvard Business School and what were your biggest takeaways?

HB: I applied to business school three years after graduating college. One of the reasons I wanted to go to business school was, first of all, everyone I had ever met who went to business school loved it. I heard 100% positive ratings. I also realized that I had a lot more to learn. I love learning, so I was excited about the possibility of going back to school.

I really liked being a consultant, but I did go into business school expecting to change careers because I wanted to get closer to the customer. Being a consultant, you work for people who are working for people. You put together PowerPoint documents but you don’t really get to see the results. I was hoping to make the leap away from professional services and more towards direct impact. I thought that consumer internet or consumer businesses would be a good place for me to land.

CJ: What advice would you give to someone who is considering going to business school?

HB: Business school is amazing. It’s also very expensive and it is two years of your life. If you already know what you want to do and have a clear path towards getting there, then maybe business school isn’t right for you. If you need to learn more about yourself and explore or want to go into a field where an MBA is a requirement, then business school is amazing. Do it.

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CJ: What skills did you have that were useful in starting Birchbox, and what do you wish you had known before taking the leap?

HB: I ask a lot of questions and I want to know why. I don’t accept the status quo and that was a big part of Katia and me coming up with the idea for Birchbox and believing that there was a better way to buy beauty online. That was a muscle that I had exercised.

My early career was as a strategy consultant at Bain & Company. In that job I learned a good mix of analytical skill sets, such as structuring a problem and knowing when it was important to have data behind things. I also learned the soft skills that come with business, such as being able to ask the right questions and package an idea to have it be accepted and get people on board with something.

CJ: What advice do you have for teenagers and young adults interested in starting their own business?

HB: Start having business conversations. If there is a business that you are interested in, such as sports, talk to someone in your life who is a business person about the business of sports. How do you make money? What are the costs? Get used to having your brain work like that. It’s most fun to learn about running a business when you’re thinking about a topic that you’re passionate about.

Work exposure is also a very important first step for a young person. Try a lot of things. I interned at so many different places and a lot of my experience was to cross off that experience as an option. I interned at a hedge fund and realized that finance was not for me. Thank goodness I figured that out early.

CJ: How do you balance running the New York and Europe offices?

HB: It’s really different. When we went from having one office to multiple offices, it was a really big change. Part of it was just getting comfortable that we wouldn’t be able to see and know about everything that was happening. We try to travel there as much as possible, usually about every six weeks. We have three offices in Europe so we try to go to two countries at a time with every trip. We also stay in touch through email and regular phone calls. It’s so different but really fun.

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CJ: How do you keep yourself motivated? What drives you forward?

HB: This is really simple but I am motivated by ideas and impact, and in particular, making people happy. The product of Birchbox is very simple when you think about it – samples in a box that arrives monthly, editorial content, and a place to shop.

The most motivating thing about my job is when I hear customers talk about what they feel when they get a Birchbox and how it makes them smile or connect with their family or friends who live across the country. That is extremely motivating. Getting your Birchbox is a real world experience that creates connections even though we’re an internet company and sell products online.

CJ: Is there anything you did as a young adult that greatly influenced you?

HB: I was a science geek in high school and doing independent science research was a helpful skill. It gave me the confidence to know that I could not only ask questions but I could also test things and find answers and iterate on it. It gave me confidence that I could be 17-years-old and contribute to science.

My family was also an influence. My family has a family business and I was exposed to those types of conversations at the dinner table my whole life. Those business conversations get soaked in somehow.

CJ: What does a day in your life look like?

HB: Every day is different. We started Birchbox three and a half years ago, and my job has fundamentally changed at least six times along the way. I get up early and try to work out before work because you never know what is going to happen later in the day. I try to do 7am workout classes and get to work by 8:30am. We have offices in Europe, so I often have phone calls with our Europe teams earlier in the morning.

Throughout the day a lot of my job is management. I check in with my direct reports to make sure everything is flowing well. I have very little sit-at-my-desk time. As co-founders, Katia and I set the strategy and make sure that the strategy is being communicated. I’ll work on monthly recaps of the business or agendas for off-sites and what is going to happen next.

CJ: How do you set personal and professional goals?

HB: I don’t have a very formal goal-setting process. I just have a lot of self-motivation. For the business we set all kinds of goals. They should be made on many different timeframes. Here we have monthly goals, quarterly goals, and annual goals. It’s also important to set five year goals.

If I had time to do that for my life, I would do it the same way. I would think about where I want to be in five years and move backwards from there. That would be fun because there’s no right answer.

CJ: What advice would you give your 20-year-old self?

HB: I give this advice to every age of my past self. Don’t take things too seriously. Don’t worry too much about your next step. Don’t think that your next step is going to dictate the rest of your life. A lot of people when they are 20-years-old think that the job they get after college is going to be their career for the next 60 years. It’s not. Don’t overthink it. Just make sure that it is something you enjoy and that you’ll learn from and go from there.

Hayley Barna Qs

Skills

Steve Prefontaine, a legendary long-distance runner who has held seven American track records, said the inspirational words above. This quote reveals that we each carry a gift inside us, but to develop and utilize whatever that gift might be we must fight hard and not be afraid to give all of our effort to it.

This past Sunday I had the opportunity to partake in the Nike Women’s Half Marathon in Washington D.C. It was my very first race of any sort and it was truly one of the most rewarding experiences that I have ever had. I am by no means a trained or skilled runner, but something inside me said “Go for it!” when Nike opened up the race registration nearly seven months ago. Not only did I learn about physical limits and how to push them, but I found new ways to challenge myself mentally and emotionally as well. Leading up to summer I will be cataloging what I learned to hopefully encourage you all and be encouraged in return by your own personal stories!

Skills

April came and went so quickly! It feels like just yesterday we were starting our 30 Day Challenge. Now that the 30 days are over, we wanted to check in to see how you all did! We have lots of questions for you. These are questions that you should think about and answer for yourselves. How did the 30 days go? Were you able to stick with one challenge for all 30 days? Where did you get stuck? How did you overcome those difficulties? Would you do another 30/31 Day Challenge?

In the past 30 days, you have set a goal and figured out a way to achieve it. That’s pretty awesome. Now that it is May 1, 31 days now await for you to take on another challenge. Are you up for it? We know we are. For April, we challenged ourselves with not hitting the snooze button. While there were mornings that we slipped and added another 15 minutes to our sleep, for the most part we re-trained ourselves not to reach for that dreaded snooze button. When our alarms went off, we were up and ready. We told our sleep selves that hitting the snooze button was not an option. On those rough days, what really helped was thinking about a good thing that we wanted out of the day, and we found ourselves eager to wake up. It’s all about finding the tricks that work for you.

For May, our challenge is to write in a Gratitude journal every night. We will write down 10 things we are grateful for with a brief explanation. There will be a post coming with more details about this because we think expressing gratitude and being self-aware are very important. What is your May 31 Day Challenge?

Good luck, and follow us on Twitter to keep up with the 31 Day Challenge!

Skills

Starting April 1, the Carpe Juvenis team is going to take on a 30 day challenge. There are 30 days in April, hence why it is called the ’30 Day Challenge.’ There can be challenges every month, but we are starting this April and we’ll see how well it goes before committing even more time. Before the 30 Day Challenge even begins, though, we are faced with our first challenge: what to challenge ourselves with! How does one go about deciding what to improve and how to make something challenging? We came up with a list, and if you have any other suggestions, please send them our way!

It is tough to choose just one from this list, but we think that focusing on one challenging thing first will help us stick with it and actually achieve our goals. There is only one rule of this Challenge: do the thing you say you are going to do each day for the entire 30 days. That’s it! It might be hard, it might be the push you need to start something you’ve been delaying, and it might even be life changing. We can’t wait to find out.

30 Day Challenge Ideas (things you will do every day):

1. Don’t hit the snooze button.

2. Read the newspaper every morning.

3. Journal every day.

4. Read one play every night.

5. Exercise.

6. Take one picture a day.

7. Blog.

8. Cook a new recipe.

9.  Go to bed early.

10. Send a handwritten letter.

11. Tell someone you love them.

12. Watch a movie.

13. Write a page of your novel.

14. Apply to internships.

15. Study another language for one hour.

Good luck, keep us posted on how it goes, and remember: good things take time. 

CultureInspirationSkills

Happy 2014! When we think of the new year, we think of how we can improve and make the next year even better. Some call these improvements resolutions, some call them goals. Either way, thinking about how you want to spend the next 365 days can be very beneficial for making the most of your time. Instead of just writing down what it is you want to do, also write down how you are going to reach your goals. When you give yourself a goal and action item combo, you’re setting yourself up for success.

Share your resolutions and goals with your friends, write them down, and say them out loud – you’re more likely to keep your resolutions when they aren’t just hanging out in your mind. Since we love working on self-improvement here at Carpe Juvenis, we wanted to share our 2014 resolutions…

1. Improve our finance knowledge.

We will read books on finance and the economy to understand how the two work together. An online class will definitely help us gain a better understanding of finance.

2. Read (at least) one book each month.

We will read every day. That’s right – every single day. Even if it is just for five minutes on the bus to school or work, a couple of pages before falling asleep, or for 20 minutes each morning. A little bit goes a long way, and the consistent reading of a few pages will accumulate to an entire novel before you know it. We will first tackle our Winter Reading List

3. Make each day count.

Academically, career-wise, and personally. Whether you want to make each day count by completing your to-do list, tackling a difficult assignment, waking up early and going for a sunrise run, or spending quality time with family and friends, make each day of 2014 count – you only get 365 of them!

4. Worry less.

Sometimes we just can’t help but worry, and then worry some more. But this year we want to be conscious of our worries and remember that we can only worry about what is in our control. Let go of the rest and let things unfold as they happen.

5. Give back more.

We will get involved in an organization for an issue that we care deeply about. If you have extra change, donate. If you have a couple of hours each month to volunteer, do it. This year we would like to give back more with our time and energy by attending organization meetings, getting involved in fundraisers/events, and by spreading awareness. 

6. Laugh (more) every day.

We laugh a lot as it is, but you can never have too many laughs in a day. We vow to laugh more, to laugh harder, and to make others laugh. 

What are your 2014 resolutions and goals?

 

LeadershipSkills

The beginning of a new year is a great time to set goals for yourself. The idea of having a fresh new start on January 1st is a motivator in itself. When we set goals, it helps to think big and then work inwards towards a more direct, specific goal. There are two types of goals to think about in 2014: Target and Adaptable goals. What do these mean?

Target goals are goals that are direct, specific goals that you want to hit on the mark. Let’s say you are working on your fitness this year and you want to increase your mile time. If you want to hit an 8-minute mile mark, that is a very specific goal that you can hit on the mark.

The second type of goal to think about is Adaptable goals, which are goals that can adjust and adapt to different situations. Your intentions in January might alter in March, and you may want to adjust your goals slightly to fit your situation at the time. Your goals do not need to be static or unchanging. In fact, having adaptable goals give you flexibility in making your goals more challenging as time goes on, or making them a little less of a reach.

Target and Adaptable goals will help you shape the type of goals you make. There is no right or wrong goal type, and while a Target goal might help you stay focused on reaching a certain point, Adaptable goals lets you freely adjust your goal path as time goes on. If you plan on making resolutions or goals for the new year, think about which kind of goals you are setting and striving to achieve.

Skills

As 2013 comes to an end, it is a great time to start reflecting on lessons you have learned in the past  year. Maybe you learned something new each day, or perhaps certain situations taught you invaluable lessons. Were you inspired by an interesting fact, a funny joke, a tidbit about your best friend, or deeply impacted by a major personal life lesson? Did you accomplish any major goals? Through your experiences in the past 365 days, what did you learn about yourself?

Taking some time to think about what 2013 taught you is great for a couple of reasons. First of all, you have gone through many experiences and most likely have grown in certain areas of your life. By recognizing these changes, you can feel proud of what you have gone through, identify what you have improved upon, and strategize ways to exceed what you have already accomplished.

Secondly, you can pinpoint strengths and weaknesses from the past year. This allows you to determine what weaknesses you want to work on in 2014 and what strengths you want to maintain.

This exercise varies for many people. It might be easy for some to think back on the year and recognize what they have learned, but for others, important lessons may be less obvious. If you fall into the latter group, make a list of things you have done and emotions you remember feeling in 2013. All of the days start to blur when you look at them as a whole, so picking out specific situations may trigger certain memories and lessons.

We’d love to know – what did 2013 teach you?

Skills

The holidays are not just a great time for seeing family, listening to Christmas music, or enjoying time off from your studies, but it is also a great excuse to get ahead and use that time wisely. When on holiday break, create a healthy balance for yourself by lounging and doing absolutely nothing so you can recover from the late nights school often requires, but also spend some of your days taking advantage of not having work to accomplish some other things you may have wanted to do. Here are 10 ways you can be productive this holiday season:

1. Get active.
If you’ve been swamped with school work and haven’t been able to find time to workout, this is the perfect time to start an exercise regimen that you can take back to school with you. You can test out new exercises that work best for your schedule and body so that you can maintain an active lifestyle when school and work picks back up.

2. Evaluate the past year and set goals. 
Now that you don’t have to worry about finals, take some time to think about how your past year went and what things you can improve upon. What goals do you have? Are there any bad habits you want to break?

3. Pick up a new hobby.
When academics, extracurriculars, team sports, and side projects take over your weekdays and weekends, it can be hard to fit in a fun hobby when it isn’t something that might “look good on your resume.” Use the holiday break to learn a new hobby and try an activity that you have been dreaming of doing.

4. Reach out to people.
Use your time to re-connect with old friends, or to make new connections. Set-up brief informational interviews to get ahead during your time off. The holidays are a busy time for many, but you never know, people might have a spare fifteen minutes to take a phone call to answer questions you have about the industry they are in, their job, or advice they have for getting your foot in the door.

5. Read. 
It can be as simple as that. Read a book that isn’t required. Spend your afternoons relaxing and catching up on great literature.

6. Do a Winternship.
Depending on how long of a break you have, you may want to use these couple of weeks or month to shadow a professional in an industry that you are intrigued by, or to try to get a winternship. Even though the winternship or job shadowing would only be for a couple of weeks, you can still get a good idea of what a certain job entails and if it is still something you are interested in.

7. Volunteer.
During this time of year, there are many organizations that can use a pair of extra hands. Volunteer at a toy drive, soup kitchen, animal shelter, or book drive. There are endless opportunities for getting involved, and your time will be greatly appreciated.

8. Sleep.
You’re probably exhausted from working so hard during the quarter/semester, so why not use this time to catch some zzz’s? Sleep in, go to sleep early, take midday naps – anything that will give your body the rest it needs.

9. Be a tourist in your own city.
It is so easy to take your city for granted. Spend a day going to visit the local museums, tourist attractions, and walking around the city parks. Who knows what you’ll learn or discover. Maybe you’ll even grow to love your home even more.

10. Make plans.
When school picks back up, you won’t have as much time to plan for the months ahead. Get a head start on summer internship or job applications, spring break plans, service trips, and family time. Even if they are brief notes jotted down on a piece of scrap paper, get your ideas onto paper. This is the first step in making your ideas come to life.

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EducationSkills

Finals are always stressful, especially when they fall right before the winter holiday. That means that while you are preparing for finals, you are also trying to arrange your trip home, pack up your bags, and shop for holiday gifts. It makes sense that on top of all these endless ‘to-dos,’ exams seem like an especially daunting task. Keep these in mind as you prepare for your winter finals…

1. Keep a Clean Work Space

Having an organized desk helps you focus better on the task at hand rather than being distracted by the clutter around you. Take one minute before each study session to throw away trash, organize pens and pencils, and remove unnecessary books or papers that you will not need for the next hour.

2. Time Yourself

Keep track of how much time you spend sitting and staring at a book or screen. It is better to concentrate for smaller increments of time if it helps you stay on track.

3. Keep a Calendar Nearby

Try hanging a poster up on your wall and mark the day finals end with a star or circle. Having a visual countdown could help keep you optimistic and concentrated on the goal!

4. Incentivize

In the world of Netflix/Facebook/Twitter/iTunes, it can be hard to stay focused while studying. To combat these temptations, give yourself small rewards along the way. For example, set a timer for two hours and at the end of that time, reward yourself with a piece of candy, a walk outside, a stretch break, or a phone call with a friend. You can also try a long-term incentive by choosing a larger reward and requiring yourself to study for an hour every day for a month. At the end of the month you are allowed to receive the reward if you have met the requirements.

5. Stay Hydrated and Snack Smartly

These tricks sound too simple to be true but they are the easiest ways to keep alert and awake. While it is easy to grab a bag of chips and a soda, the best way to stay full and hydrated is by eating fruits or veggies and slurping down H20!

6. Work at Your Desk

If you live in a small dorm room, avoid combining your private space with your work space. Do not sit on your bed while doing work, as this leads to distractions and a nap you did not see coming. If you do not have a desk in your room, head over to the library or work at your dining room table. Designating a work space will help keep you on track.

Good luck with your exams!

EducationHealthSkills

Is the excitement of heading back to school wearing off? While there are changes happening everywhere around you (just look outside at those leaves turning orange), you might feel like you are in need of your own change when you feel your energy levels crashing. Exams, projects, presentations, and homework might be piling up, and since school just started, there’s no break or end in sight. In order to stay on top of all your work without completely burning out, pick and choose which of these 8 ways might help prevent back-to-school burnout and keep your enthusiasm at its peak…

1. Take breaks. Preventing burnout doesn’t have to happen on a grand scale, but instead you can incorporate little changes into your everyday life. Schedule mini-breaks into your routine, giving yourself 15 minutes to do whatever you want. After 1 hour of studying or essay writing, give yourself 10 minutes to listen to music, practice your new hobby (see #3), or have an impromptu dance party. Do anything that makes you feel great and takes your mind off of work for those precious 10-15 minutes.

2. Plan a fun weekend activity. Get a group of your friends together for a fun weekend activity. When you have something to look forward to during the week, there’s a good chance you will keep your energy levels up so you can get through your work and enjoy your Saturday plans. Instead of doing your regular weekend activities, organize something new and out of the ordinary. Plan activities that are inspired by the season, such as picking apples at your local orchard, seeking out early haunted houses, or hosting a pie-making party.

3. Learn a new hobby. This might sound ridiculous, since you probably have zero time to add anything to your plate. However, even the smallest changes could change-up your entire routine and give you a fresh perspective. For example, learning a new hobby such as knitting or painting are calming hobbies that work around your schedule. You have complete control and practicing your hobby for just 15-30 minutes a day can be a total game changer.

4. Review your routine. Every now and then, it is important to step back and evaluate where you are in your life. In this case, step back and review your routine for the past week. Are there changes you can make that would give you more energy, such as going to sleep 10 minutes earlier? Perhaps sitting in a different seat in class would positively affect your interactions with your teacher and classmates? Pack a snack for when your blood sugar level drops and you need a quick boost. Changing your routine doesn’t have to be a lot of work – little changes can make a big difference.

5. Remember your goals. Did you set goals for the beginning of the new school year? Maybe you set a goal of meeting with your teacher once a week for an entire semester, or you wanted to focus on learning how to do Derivative and Integration formulas like a pro. If you didn’t set goals for yourself, this would be a good time to think about what you want out of the school year. When you start thinking about your goals and what it is you truly want to accomplish, you may become re-motivated and avoid feelings of burnout.

6. Sleep. It might be as simple as catching some zzz’s in order to get back to your energetic self. With the loads of work, extra-curriculars, and team practices, your body might be telling you to slow down and rest. Whether you need to take a long afternoon nap or just work on trying to get 7-8 hours of sleep every night, be conscious of what your body is telling you.

7. Take a stroll. Sometimes you just need to drop everything and walk it out. When you feel yourself getting exhausted from work, chores, or school, stop drop and stroll. Surrounding yourself with nature and breathing in fresh air will clear your mind and give you a new perspective on what is happening in your life.

8. Talk it out. Oftentimes we tend to keep our feelings to ourselves. Talking out how to feel is healthy, and one way to prevent burning out is to talk to your friends, family, and teachers about how you feel. You might learn that your friends are feeling the exact same way. It feels great to know that you are not alone, especially when you are feeling vulnerable and exhausted. Your school year is just getting started, don’t burnout now.

How do you prevent back-to-school burnout?