Education

When you’re in high school or college, most of your time is spent around people your age. We become absorbed in the humor, language, and habits of those in our age group. Even when seeking advice, peers are often times the first ones we turn to for a sense of understanding. Our common ground is our shared space in time, and there is something very comforting and familiar about that.

However, there are two untapped pools of wisdom that we are missing out on when we stay age-centric. While we are trekking through the first quarter of our lives, we need to learn as much as we can from the two groups of people that flank the spectrum of life: children and the elderly.

So, what exactly can they teach us? Well for starters, we all need to stop worrying about everything. Karl Pillemer, a Ph.D in gerontology at Cornell University, interviewed over a thousand elderly Americans and asked them for some good old (pun intended) life advice. Over and over again in 30 Lessons for Living, the interviewees talked about how they regret having spent so much time mindlessly worrying about things out of their control. Rather than letting moments pass by in constant anxiety, they talked about the importance to “take time to craft the story of your life” instead. It’s more about investing in your legacy, and less about the things that can get in your way. Even the young ones of the world have similar sentiments.

“Children are happy because they don’t have a file in their minds called “All the Things That Could Go Wrong.”

– Marianne Williamson

For budding adults, that file in our minds just seems to get larger and larger with each decision we make. If we want a bit of childish ease to rub off on us, it’s best to keep observing how they choose to live. In a Ted Talk with internationally renowned speaker and author Caroline McHugh, childhood is discussed as a place in our lives in which people are most authentic. McHugh says that “when you’re a kid, you’re fantastic at being yourself because you don’t know how to disguise your differentness.” Kids are not afraid to show up in the world as themselves. They may be unaware, but they are also unaffected by the judgment of others. There’s a beauty in that sort of freedom of thought, that no matter what kind of millennial dilemma we may be going through, we can choose to hide less of ourselves and be proud of who we are.

Those with just a few years under their belt and those with only a few years left, these are the people that have a lot to share. Lighten up a little, feel self-assured, and enjoy what is right in front of you: today.

Image: Gratisography

CultureInspiration

There it is. The middle of July has just passed (gasp!), and summer is in full blown effect. Instagram is loaded with friends going on vacation in France or drinking mimosas on the beach. When you aren’t shopping for your bikini top, you’re probably making money to buy one. If you aren’t looking up the cutest outfits for your summer office internship, you’re probably actually at it. But what if you’re in a slump? You only get as far as the interview, and your inbox has been gathering dust. Or maybe there’s personal stuff going on and making a decision like that is the last thing on your mind.

Hey. That’s okay.

This summer is for you. Your time to do what you need to do. Sometimes you need to slow down the pace before you can pick it back up, and sometimes what you’re looking for is right around the corner and you just have to get there, one step at a time. This summer is clay and you can take it in your hands and do whatever you want to it. You can mold your time to be slow and easy and relaxing, or design it to be fast-­paced and exciting. You don’t have to work or intern for it to be yours. There’s a world of things to do and and it’s waiting for you.

If you’re feeling envious of your friends abroad, make it a mission for yourself to explore your city and to get to know it as much as you can. Teach yourself a new language. Watch foreign films. Find a place where you’re comfortable and draw in a sketchbook your own world.

This summer is your space, your zone. Take it easy and work through what you need to work through. Be gentle with yourself. Love yourself and take care of yourself. If you’re not ready to take the world on just yet, then don’t. One step at a time. Take a walk around the block, then around the park, then the beach. Make yourself a small breakfast, then a healthy one, and eat it with satisfaction.

Don’t worry about what other people are doing, or what they’re saying, or what they’re thinking. Everybody goes at their own pace and so should you. Don’t worry if nothing is working out, soon it will. Don’t worry if you feel like you’re falling behind, you’re not. Don’t worry if you need time for yourself this summer, take it and it’s yours. Make this summer about being happy and healthy, and don’t worry about the rest.

Image: Unsplash

CultureInspirationSkills

Happy 2014! When we think of the new year, we think of how we can improve and make the next year even better. Some call these improvements resolutions, some call them goals. Either way, thinking about how you want to spend the next 365 days can be very beneficial for making the most of your time. Instead of just writing down what it is you want to do, also write down how you are going to reach your goals. When you give yourself a goal and action item combo, you’re setting yourself up for success.

Share your resolutions and goals with your friends, write them down, and say them out loud – you’re more likely to keep your resolutions when they aren’t just hanging out in your mind. Since we love working on self-improvement here at Carpe Juvenis, we wanted to share our 2014 resolutions…

1. Improve our finance knowledge.

We will read books on finance and the economy to understand how the two work together. An online class will definitely help us gain a better understanding of finance.

2. Read (at least) one book each month.

We will read every day. That’s right – every single day. Even if it is just for five minutes on the bus to school or work, a couple of pages before falling asleep, or for 20 minutes each morning. A little bit goes a long way, and the consistent reading of a few pages will accumulate to an entire novel before you know it. We will first tackle our Winter Reading List

3. Make each day count.

Academically, career-wise, and personally. Whether you want to make each day count by completing your to-do list, tackling a difficult assignment, waking up early and going for a sunrise run, or spending quality time with family and friends, make each day of 2014 count – you only get 365 of them!

4. Worry less.

Sometimes we just can’t help but worry, and then worry some more. But this year we want to be conscious of our worries and remember that we can only worry about what is in our control. Let go of the rest and let things unfold as they happen.

5. Give back more.

We will get involved in an organization for an issue that we care deeply about. If you have extra change, donate. If you have a couple of hours each month to volunteer, do it. This year we would like to give back more with our time and energy by attending organization meetings, getting involved in fundraisers/events, and by spreading awareness. 

6. Laugh (more) every day.

We laugh a lot as it is, but you can never have too many laughs in a day. We vow to laugh more, to laugh harder, and to make others laugh. 

What are your 2014 resolutions and goals?