CultureLearn

With low temperatures and high winds keeping you inside, you’re going to need some reading material. These great reads make late winter look pretty darn appealing…

late 6THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN BY PAULA HAWKINS

We’re excited to read this novel about a woman who sees something
shocking during her commute on the train. Reminding us a bit of
Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express (because of the mystery
and the train, of course), we look forward to being completely consumed
by this story.

 

 

 

late 5

ALL THE LIGHT WE CANNOT SEE BY ANTHONY DOERR

This novel about a blind French girl and a German boy whose paths
collide in occupied France as they try to survive the devastation of
World War II looks powerful and emotional.

 

 

 

 

late 3FUNNY GIRL BY NICK HORNBY

Author Nick Hornby is back with Funny Girl, a story set
in the 1960’s in London and follows the adventures of
an innocent young woman and her transformation into
a television starlet.

 

 

 

late 2LAUGHING WITHOUT AN ACCENT: ADVENTURES OF
A GLOBAL CITIZEN BY FIROOZEH DUMAS

Firoozeh Dumas explores her Persian heritage and shares
stories about her family, culture, and being a citizen of the world.
Dumas’s wit and insight makes this book look like a humorous
and fun read.

 

 

 

late 7WE MAMMALS IN HOSPITABLE TIMES BY JYNNE DILLING MARTIN

This book of poetry looks captivating. Jynne Dilling Martin spent six
weeks living in Antarctica shadowing scientists and writing about
what she witnessed. We’re already hooked.

 

 

 

 

late 10 TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD BY HARPER LEE

We can’t help but love this classic novel from our childhood.
Author Harper Lee is releasing her anticipated novel Go Set a Watchman
in July 2015, and we can’t wait to re-read this beloved book.

 

 

 

 

late 9 THE GOOD EARTH BY PEARL S. BUCK

Pearl S. Buck writes a beautiful and painful story about China
in the 1920’s. The story of farmer Wang Lung and his wife
O-Lan spans decades, and the changes in history and tradition
are apparent as the years pass.

 

 

 

late 8AND THE MOUNTAINS ECHOED BY KHALED HOSSEINI

We loved The Kite Runner so much, and it’s almost embarrassing
that we haven’t yet read Hosseini’s newest novel. Hosseini
explores the way families nurture, betray, and sacrifice for
one another.

 

 

 

What’s on your late winter reading list?

CultureEducation

Happy summer! Now that the school year is over for several months, it’s time to kick back and read the books you’ve had to put off for essays and exams. Whether you’re on an airplane, on the beach, or in a cozy chair next to the window, pick up one of these summer reads and enjoy! P.S. Did you have a chance to read any books off of the spring reading list?

1. My Salinger Year by Joanna Rakoff

We can’t get enough of memoirs, and this one looks juicy and captivating. Rakoff recalls her experiences in New York City working for J.D. Salinger. We bet this story will be captivating from the first page to the last.

2. The Interestings by Meg Wolitzer

We’ve seen this book around for a while but have yet to read it. This story about six teenagers at a summer camp for the arts and how they grow into middle age looks like a great slice-of-life novel. We’re excited to see how these six friendships change as life progresses, especially through the complexities of each character.

3. The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown

Talk about an inspiring read. The Boys in the Boat tells the story of nine Americans and their quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. We love stories about beating the odds, hard work, perseverance, and true grit.

4. How Not to Be Wrong: The Power of Mathematical Thinking by Jordan Ellenberg

It doesn’t matter if you love math or hate math. How Not to Be Wrong shows us how math is intertwined with everything we do with a fascinating perspective. With chapters like “What to Expect When You’re Expecting to Win the Lottery” and “Dead Fish Don’t Read Minds,” color us intrigued. Math may not have been our strongest subject in high school, but we have a feeling we might start to like it now.

5. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars is the story about a wealthy family who meets on their private island every summer. A book appropriate for summer, this book has suspense, true love, and a gripping plot. Sounds good to us!

We’d love to know, what are you reading this summer?

CultureEducation

Now that fall and winter have passed, it’s time for a spring cleaning! That means our bookshelves are getting a makeover. There are lots of great books coming out this spring, and we can’t wait to dive in! The hardest question is which one to read first. This spring we are looking for some inspiring reads that will motivate us and help carry us through to summer, where there is no homework, exciting travel plans, more time to volunteer, and when senioritis is relieved. These are the books we are reading this spring…

1. The Promise of a Pencil by Adam Braun

Do you dream of starting your own non-profit? Do you want to help others in the world? How about just be inspired to find your calling? Adam Braun shares his personal experience of how he started Pencils of Promise in this bestseller. Braun shares his lessons learned along the way so that you, too, can follow your passion and make a difference. P.S. Read our interview with Adam here!

2. I Am That Girl: How to Speak Your Truth, Discover Your Purpose, and #bethatgirl by Alexis Jones

What’s your passion or purpose in this world? Alexis Jones inspires people to dream bigger and leave the world a better place. You are good enough and you don’t need to be perfect, whatever ‘perfect’ means. We’re excited to be empowered!

3. I Just Graduated…Now What? by Katherine Schwarzenegger

Are you graduating or did you just graduate? Are you tired of being asked what you want to do with the rest of your life? Katherine Schwarzenegger interviews awesome people about how they felt when they had just graduated from college. This should be an inspiring read.

4. The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton

This 1967 coming-of-age classic is a great novel to re-read several times, and it tells the story of two rival groups – the Greasers and the Socs. S.E. Hinton started writing the novel when she was just fifteen-years-old, and the final book was published when she was eighteen. Pretty incredible. Having read this book in high school, it will be a nice refresher to re-read and get lost in the world of Ponyboy Curtis.

5. Zen and the Art of Happiness by Chris Prentiss

Change the way you look at situations so that you can see them in a positive light. This book should be a breeze to get through, while being powerful and life changing at the same time.

What’s on your bookshelf this spring?

 

Culture

With the holidays coming up, there will be more time for reading thanks to long plane rides and lack of school work. In September, October, and November, we kept busy with our fall reading list, but now it’s time to crack open some new books. These are the ones we can’t wait to read this winter…

1. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

This story is about Hazel, a sixteen-year-old cancer patient who attends a support group, where she meets and falls in love with an ex-basketball player and amputee, Augustus Waters.

2. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak

Set in Nazi Germany, this book is narrated by Death and tells the story of a young girl and her relationship with her foster parents, her neighbors, and a young Jewish man who hides in her house during the height of World War II.

3. The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger

A story of teenage angst, identity, belonging, and alienation, Holden Caulfield is the novel’s protagonist who leaves his prep school and goes to New York City.

4. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

A modern look at the emotions and experiences of growing up.

5. Life of Pi by Yann Martel

A young Indian boy named Pi is stranded on a lifeboat with a Bengal tiger for 227 days.

Happy reading!