EducationWork

Congrats on your new gig! You’re now a real live college grad and super excited that you’ll be able to pay something when your student loans arrive in six months. Whether you landed your dream job or are just starting out somewhere, doing something, that pays somewhat, there are unwritten rules of do’s and don’ts on your first day. I’m not talking about the basics, like being on time (aka early). I’m referring to some of the things that maybe aren’t so obvious to everyone. After all, making first impressions is important, and you want to bring more to the table than just your I-can-do-everything-smile. To make sure you are putting yourself in the best position for success at this new company, consider aiming to accomplish these five goals during your first week:

  1. Don’t share. You may have had an amazing time at the bar crawl last Saturday, but no one needs to know that. They also don’t need to know about your Instagram account full of selfies #summer2015. Even if you’re in a company full of young 20-somethings and hear them talking about their social lives in great detail, don’t be the newbie that tries to fit in by oversharing how much you are just like them. I’m not saying you should totally lie about yourself, but pretend like you’re talking to a 12-year-old: “I love movies, reading, and just hanging out with my friends!” Keep it short, simple, and while I’m sure you’re a smart and responsible person, there’s no need to give anyone the chance to think otherwise. Besides, your goal is to be better than everyone, so don’t act like everyone.
  2. Observe. This is similar to the first goal, only with an emphasis on carefully paying attention to what people are saying and doing. You may not get more than two minutes of interaction with each coworker on your first day, but subtle demeanors can be telling: Who had an obnoxiously firm hand grip? Which people look like they’re in a clique? Who looked like they were bored at work? Who’s got their face buried in their desk? Take a mental note of these things, because the more you know about others, the better you can gauge how to conduct yourself. The truth is, while there’s a possibility of developing real friendships with these people, they are still, first and foremost, your coworkers. Office politics are a real thing and don’t underestimate other people’s motives.
  3. To ask or not to ask (for help). If you’ve never had a job in an office setting before, that’s perfectly understandable! You don’t have to act like you know everything and you should get comfortable with asking your manager or peers about certain things. If you don’t know where the printer paper is located, just ask! If you don’t know where they keep the coffee cups, just ask! If you get asked to do something that you’ve never done before, even if it’s as simple as making mailing labels on Word, I suggest trying to figure it out first. Click some buttons, Google some stuff, and if you’re still clueless, don’t be embarrassed to ask. At least you tried learning on your own first before seeking help! But remember everything you’re taught, because asking the same question routinely within the first month is definitely not a good thing.
  4. Set your ego aside. Chances are, you’re not the boss or the team lead in the company (if you are, then that’s amazing!), so you might find it a little difficult to accept the fact that you are in a different position – socially and professionally. If you were the all-star athlete, honor student, or student government president in school, then starting at the bottom of the totem pole might be a hard pill to swallow. In my first job, my responsibilities included ordering the food for company meetings, ordering office supplies, and fetching office mail. Don’t fall into the mindset that you’re “too good” for it. You are not better than the job. You are exactly where you’re supposed to be, and everything is a learning opportunity. The beginning of your professional career starts with humility and integrity.
  5. Do what you say you’re going to do. There’s probably a good chance that you’re one of the youngest people in the company. That means you have to prove yourself in this new corporate landscape as a reliable, valuable, and impactful team member. Gaining the trust from superiors and peers is crucial, and this is done by doing what you say you’re going to do, when you’re going to do it, regardless of the outcome. If you say you’re going to email back, email them back. If you say you’ll look into something, look into it and provide an update. People may forget what you promised, but when you actually do it, it separates you from everyone else as a leader. Branding yourself as the person who doesn’t just say things “just to say them” is extremely meaningful for your career.

The first few steps of your professional life can be rocky at first. Social dynamics change and you might find yourself in a lot of awkward moments. But keep these tips in mind and one day you’ll be giving advice to the next newbie!

Image: Getrefe

EducationFinanceSkills

Whether you are extremely cautious about how you spend your money or you only check your bank statement once in a blue moon, keeping on budget can be difficult when we least expect it. Maybe you grab dinner with a friend and it ends up costing more than you thought, or you need to make a last minute purchase that you can’t find at a discount. Whatever it may be, here are some ways to help keep you on budget no matter what hiccups come your way.

  1. Buy in “Bulk”. This tip may seem counter intuitive, but hear me out. Think carefully about the things you’re constantly re-purchasing, whether they’re razor blades, toilet paper, laundry detergent, rice, pasta, so on and so forth. If you know that you use certain things over and over without fail, consider buying in “bulk.” That doesn’t mean buying 1,000 units of toilet paper at a time, but instead of grabbing a pack of four rolls every week try buying a 16 or 24 pack online for less cost per roll. It may seem frustrating to spend more money than you’re used to at once, but in the long run you can be saving a lot more. Food can be a bit tricker – make sure you’re only buying non-perishable goods that you can store in a cool, dry space.
  2. Always Make a Shopping List. When you head to the grocery store or mall – or even a restaurant for that matter – without having thought through what you need, you’ll be more likely to throw unnecessary things in your cart that you want in that moment but regret later. Go through your refrigerator and pantry and sort out what you already have so that you don’t buy duplicates. When you go to the mall, park closest to the store you’re going to and make a beeline once you get inside. Don’t let your eyes wander or else your money might, too.
  3. Know What Your Necessities Cost. Sit down and plot out what you need to pay every month. This includes bills, groceries, transportation – the basics that you can’t go without. Add all those numbers up and subtract it from what you’re earning, and you’ll have a more realistic understanding of how much extra money you really have. Consider putting another 10-20% of that “extra” money away in a savings account. Without knowing your bottom line you’re sure to overspend.
  4. Set Aside Spending Money. It’s a great idea to build in spontaneity and fun into your life. Set aside a “fun” fund and keep that money separate from your necessities and savings. It might help to keep this extra spending money in cash form, so that you have a tangible idea of how much there really is to spend each week. Sometimes swiping a card allows us to dissociate from the fact that we are spending money, and we tend to over-do it.
  5. Create a Long Term Goal. Think about your financial goals. This doesn’t need to be super complicated. It can be as simple as “I want to save $100 in the next five months.” That means that you need to be putting aside $20 each month to hit that goal. Maybe there’s something you need to buy for work or school – figure out how much that will cost and set a goal to be able to afford it and in what amount of time. Long term goals can be as basic as you want them to be – the main point is that you’ll be learning how to save little by little and it won’t feel as overwhelming.

Good luck with staying on budget and let me know what your tips are!

Image: Flickr

EducationSkills

Being in college has taught me how to be smart financially. Instead of buying the pair of cute leather boots I see at the mall, I put aside the money I would use to buy them so that I can afford next semester’s textbooks. If you’re like me and are unemployed, then saving money is the key to surviving college.

There have been plenty of times when I have forgone buying something I really wanted so that I could afford the things that I needed. My biggest fear of buying something that I wanted is that the money spent would be needed at a later time, and since I don’t want to ever be in that situation I stop myself from buying a new book, nail polish, or whatever else it is that I’d want when I’m out shopping with my friends or online.

I’m not, in any way, saying that saving your money and making smart choices with how you spend it is bad. Because it’s not. It’s good to think about how you’re spending your finances, especially if you have don’t have a steady income and can’t always ask your parent(s) for money. But it isn’t good to stress yourself over spending money on things that you want, especially if you’re the kind of person who can refrain from going on a shopping spree.

You are a college student. You spend most of your time doing homework and studying and waking up early for class. That might not seem like much to people with full-time jobs, but college is hard and it takes up a good amount of your time. It is also, as many of you know from experience, very stressful at times, which is why I think that everyone deserves to treat themselves once in a while. It doesn’t – and shouldn’t necessarily – have to be every week. Let’s say, for example, that you’ve stuck strictly to cafeteria food. Why not purposefully save up for a nice dinner and take yourself out for a special treat once a month? Maybe you haven’t gotten a new pair of pants in a while or you really want some new jewelry for an upcoming interview – whatever it is that you want, save up specifically for that item or experience, and don’t be afraid to treat yourself to it!

You can still be smart about how much you spend. Maybe choose something from the clearance rack at the mall instead of something that is extremely expensive. If you have come this far without splurging and you put enough aside for a special treat, then buying one thing might not hurt you. Focus on getting something that you have been wanting for the longest time but you just didn’t let yourself buy it because you needed to do laundry or buy textbooks instead.

There will be a time when you’re going to have to choose necessities over what you want. But that time might not necessarily be right now, so treat yourself when you can and still be smart about the things that you buy. In my opinion, that is part of being financially smart. Again, don’t stress yourself out over saving money. I have done that many times and it’s not fun. So, I hope after you finish reading this, you’ll be inspired to go buy what you’ve always wanted (within reason, of course). You might not realize it until much later but occasionally purchasing things that are not college related is a necessity too.

Image: Flickr

CollegeFinanceSkills

It’s time for college. It’s also time for budget crunching, piggy bank breaking, as well as money saving. Our wallets tend to go on a diet when we go to college, but here are some tips to keep your wallet saturated with healthy greens and to make yourself happy with those few extra bucks.

1. Price Comparisons for Textbooks

Unless you cannot find a book anywhere on the Internet, go to the student store on your university campus. Word on the street is that the student store charges more than the retailer themselves. Use websites like SlugBooks to buy cheaper priced books.

2. Go for Paperback Books

Paperback or hardcover, you’re still getting the same information, aren’t you? You don’t need the hardcover book. Find a paperback and use it whenever you can. Besides, paperbacks are much lighter on your back.

3. Renting Textbooks

Have a general education class such as Economics 101 that you’re taking to fulfill some requirement? Never going to open that book again once the class will have finished? Rent the book. Do not buy it. Though you cannot make too many marks (or any, depending on the rule), renting your textbook can save you over a hundred dollars. You can use it and access it at any point after it is delivered to you, and then you just have to ship it back on the due date, so make sure you take note of that!

4. Use Public Transportation or a Bike

Do not bring your car with you to campus, especially if you are a first-year. Paying for parking is quite a hassle, and can drain your wallet instantaneously. Use buses; they’re quite popular on college campuses, especially with universities that are small cities, such as Chapel Hill. Students usually ride for free, which is awesome because who doesn’t like free services and goods? Also, you’re doing the environment a huge favor by not emitting exhaustion gas into the atmosphere. Bikes are another good idea, as this investment can go very far, literally and metaphorically. Bikes are street safe and walk path safe, and you’ll be on-time to class almost every time.

5. Sell Your Old High School Stuff

I, for one, had a lot of old Advanced Placement (AP) guidebooks left over from high school. Though some are still useful references to me, a lot of them were not, especially for the classes that have nothing to do with my intended major and that I had placement credit for. I just sold it on Amazon and made almost a hundred dollars. Don’t limit yourself to just books—sell anything that you simply cannot use anymore (within reason of course).

6. Make a Budget

Try organizing your spending and income into a table such as this one:

Money Spent Item Bought Service Spent on Earnings
$3 2% Milk
$40 From Tutoring
$10 Getting Eyebrows Done
$100 Selling things
$50 Textbook

This is just a neat way to help you keep track of everything! You will never have to wonder where that one dollar went, and you’ll feel more in control of your money.

7. Work Study, Jobs, and Internships

This is perhaps the most obvious way grab ahold of fortunes during high school. However, it should also be remembered that jobs teach you the value of money. For some people, it’ll send the message of “Do I need to buy that Sephora lipstick? I have to use MY money.” You’ll rethink buying some of your coveted material objects, but in the end you will be glad you thought some of your monetary decisions and purchases through.

Money is all around us. We just have to know how to hold on to it. Learning how to be responsible with your money now can truly benefit you in the future. When there’s an economic crisis in the future, you’ll know how to handle it from your experiences during your youthful years. Best of luck to those of you going to college or are in college, and always have a positive mindset!

Image: 401kcalculator.org

ExploreFinanceSkillsTravel

Most of us want to travel the world, yet so few of us actually do it. We plan to save up, but somehow we just can’t stretch our dollars; we spend them on stuff before we can spend them on trips.

Having traveled through much of Southeast Asia (and a few other countries) on a very limited budget, I have met travel experts with lots of advice, and developed my own money saving tricks. Next week I will share my budget travel tips, but this article is about traveling with almost no money and either cutting out certain expenses (accommodations, food and transportation), or earning money while traveling.

I read a very accurate quote that went something like, “if you want to travel, you either have to spend time or money.” If you’re willing to sacrifice a little time so you can soak in unfamiliar cultures, see the world, meet new people and grow, these options could be for you.

1. Hostel Work Exchange

These jobs often offer free housing (and sometimes meals) in exchange for work, or they will simply pay you hourly. Hostel jobs are fairly competitive, so if possible, it is suggested to arrive in a location a bit before peak seasons for less stress. (i.e. before May or June in New York)

This site offers forums for job seekers and hostel employers to post opportunities. Hostel Management is another good hostel job search site.

2. Teach English Abroad

Teaching is quite a commitment, so this option is not for those who are iffy about that.

Most salaried positions last at least a year. Many schools will pay for housing among other amenities, and some (primarily in Asia) will even cover the flights to and from the host country. Some locations pay better than others. I have friends who have paid off student loans and traveled Asia with the salaries they made in South Korea.

Getting a certification to teach English (TEFL) is not always required but will both prepare you and bump up your salary. The following sites can get you certified and/or placed:

Oxford Seminars: Awesome. Pricey TEFL (teaching English as a foreign language) certification, but it includes classroom instruction, a practicum, a massively extensive database of schools in hundreds of countries and three textbooks to help you along the way. Plus, awesome like-minded classmates that can become travel buddies. As a former Oxford Seminars student, I recommend this wholeheartedly.

CIEE: I haven’t used this, but it’s a very reputable and reliable program that many friends have used to both teach and study abroad. They provide training and an optional TEFL certification.

People Recruit: This sends people directly to South Korea. A friend’s brother used this and had a great experience with it. It does not include a TEFL certification as Korea doesn’t require it.

3. WWOOFing

WWOOF stands for Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms. It pairs travelers with hosts and allows them to work on a farm, co-op, garden, or related space in exchange for food and accommodation.

WWOOF website for more information.

4. Odd jobs

These include working as a server/bartender, laborer, au pair, tour guide, and more. When you arrive in a location, look for “hiring” signs. Hop into restaurants and offices, bring your resume and be prepared to spend a little time unemployed and searching. Business cards help, too, but be sure they’re simple and universally useable. Additionally, highlight language and professional skills, and ensure you’re easily reachable within your host country (local phone number, provide email, etc.). This option requires more spontaneity, but it’s very doable and will offer some pay to live off of and travel with.

5. Working Holiday Scheme

Several countries offer working holiday visas and the opportunity to take on low-wage, seasonal jobs. The visas are available for people under 35 and typically last up to a year.

6. Skill-based jobs

You can do more than wait tables or answer phones if you want. It may take more digging, but will pay better and utilize your skills and any education you’ve received.

Alliance Abroad offers work placements before departure and provides accommodations. I’ve never used it but have heard it recommended before. They provide placements for business, event planning, food preparation and other skilled positions, as well as internships and general service positions.

7. Couch Surf

Couchsurfing allows you to link up with hosts in any country in the world and stay with them for free. Be sure to check up on the local culture’s etiquette so you know whether to bring a gift, buy meals, etc. Couchsurfers and hosts are generally open-minded travel-lovers who enjoy making new friends and helping others enjoy their cities. The database offers extensive reviews on hosts and ways to connect with other surfers.

8. Home Exchange

Swap apartments or houses for a trip. This allows you to stay, rent-free, in someone else’s home in your travel destination. HomeExchange is a good option for this.

9. Yacht or Cruise Ship Jobs

These are paid positions that include free room and board, meals and other expenses. These opportunities often go overlooked. While not a piece of cake, it is easier than one would think to find a safe, reputable job on a yacht or cruise ship.

Some good sites for finding service jobs on yachts or cruise ships include Crew 4 Crew, Jobs on Yachts and Cruise Ship Jobs.

Traveling with little money requires the traveler to let go of hard plans and remain open to sudden changes. It means time spent. It also often means no frills: hostels, street food, homestays, and sometimes a lack of western amenities. Challenges are part of it, though, and the memories and growth that travel create are incredible!

Plus, who knows? You may find your passion is teaching, farming, boating, or something you never dreamed of!

(Aside from friends and personal experience, Nomadic Matt had some great tips that helped with this article. He’s a fantastic budget travel blogger.)

What are your tips and resources for traveling paid or without significant expenses?

Image: Garry Knight, Flickr

EducationHealth

Have you ever wondered how specific magazines, spam letters, or specific ads find you in the large nebulous that is the internet? Well, Twitter’s recent refurbishment of their ad-revenue model, which now closely resembles the model used by Facebook, gives insight into just how media executives use your electronic history to sell products.

Currently the social media site receives payment for every ad selected by a user. However, in the coming month, Twitter will offer companies the ability to control how they repay Twitter for advertisements. For example, a clothing website could pay Twitter only when a user is steered towards looking at the upcoming collection. Other options include payments after seeing a growth in followers for that specific company, number of app downloads, or the company could even pay for social media user’s email addresses in order to bombard them with advertisements. Before, one had to go out of the way to follow companies or click on ads, make it a personal mission to find media which would direct away from normal social media interactions, whereas now something as simple as retweeting can lead to pop ups and filtration of what content is received.

Like Facebook, Twitter users will have to consciously think about the choices they make on the site. By choosing to download the app, you are giving the company the ability to see your search history and make ads that cater to your previously visited websites. By clicking on an ad, you are telling Twitter exactly what it is you are interested in and allowing them to alter the type of media you are exposed to while its website.

This means that social media has further filtered what people are able to access online. Yes, one could still search for other things in media, but what will be received more frequently because of this new model is very watered-down form of media; diluted media that only exposes the viewer to small portions of what the planet is going through. And although Twitter and Facebook might find this to be an attractive idea for ad companies, they are putting their viewer’s content and the amount of cash earned from ads at risk- now it actually takes more effort to see more ads and earn money.

Either way, this situation limits what can be seen and done online. Someone who finds the ads for polls on celebrities will never see world news pop up on their feed, just as people who follow CNN will never escape the newsroom’s melodrama. This circumstance forces users of social media to be more scrupulous of what they search for online, because using these outlets of communication forfeit privacy and choice over what they consume.

Image: Flickr

Travel

There are a few more weeks in summer to go on a trip! If you opt for a road trip, you will have a lot of fun. Before you go, though, there are a few must-have items to bring so that you can cruise peacefully. Here are eight important items you won’t want to forget:

1. Gas/ Food/ Emergency Money

I know this is an obvious one, but it is still worth mentioning. You don’t want to get stranded before you get anywhere.

2. Food

When you’re on a long stretch of road, who knows when you’ll see food again. It’s always good to have some snacks on hand so you don’t get too hungry. Or worse: grumpy in a car full of people because you’re hungry. Bringing a cooler can be helpful for snacks when you absolutely need them.

3. Games and Toys

If you are traveling with kids, games and toys are a must. However, they’re also great for adults. Playing a trivia game or a guessing game can help pass the time and keep others engaged.

4. Good Music

Be it an awesome playlist, CDs, or the radio, music can keep a long road trip feel a lot shorter. You can share your favorite music with those closest to you. You might just love hearing something new.

5. Something To Sleep With

Road trips are long. If you are not driving, you are welcome to rest. Comfortable clothes are good since you will be sitting for hours, so you may as well wear pajamas or sweatpants. Add a pillow, a blanket, and a sleep mask to block out the light so you can get some much needed rest.

6. A Cellphone

I know this is a necessity for a lot of people. Cellphones have many great uses. You can use it as a GPS, for games, music, a camera and most importantly, to contact people! Remember to keep it charged in case you get stranded and really need it. Having a car cellphone charger on hand is never a bad idea.

7. Maps

If you lose signal or run out of battery and have no electronic GPS, you could end up really lost. Maps still exist for a reason. Use them.

8. First Aid Kit

Many first aid kits come travel-sized these days. They are cheap and useful if the situation arises.

I hope these tips make the ride enjoyable for everyone! Have fun!

Image: weheartit

CultureSkillsTravel

Road trips are a fun way to spend the summer. If you have the free time and the gas money, it is a great choice. It gives you the opportunity to spend time with family, friends or a significant other. Here’s how you can plan one:

1. Pick a Location

The trick here is to pick a place you want to go, as well as finding the right time to go. If it takes three days to drive to your destination, you have to also factor in breaks for meals and using the restroom. Plus, if there are not enough people and little desire to drive continuously, you may need to spend a few nights in hotels. That will make the entire trip take longer. You want to make sure you have enough time to and from your destination. 

2. Figure Out Who To Invite

Traveling is fun but it can also be hard. If you are stuck in a car with someone for hours or days on end, make sure you like that person. More importantly, how many people you invite can mean different cars. Keep in mind that if you are the only one with a driver’s license, you will be the only one driving. That will mean more work for you. You also need to find people who can go on the trip at the same time as you.

3. Logistics

Timing can be everything on a road trip. You have to factor in times to stop for food, gas, and rest. You should also make reservations somewhere if you need them. Sleeping in your car is not always safe. You do not want to end up in an unfamiliar area and not be able to find a place to sleep. Above all things you should find out how much time you want to spend at your destination. That might determine how many breaks you take.

4. Pack Well

You want to bring everything you need. Gas and food money are a must. However, you do not want to over-pack. There needs to be enough room in the car for everyone.

Lastly, remember to have fun! These memories can last a lifetime.

Image: Unsplash

EducationSkills

Growing up means independence. However, there is also new responsibility. An easy way to simplify your life? Create a budget. It sounds boring, but honestly it requires almost no maintenance and very little time to actually do. Here’s a simple way of creating a budget:

Find Out How Much Money Is Coming In

This is the easiest thing to do. Total up your paychecks, or if you are receiving money from your family, total up how much they are giving you. It is worth knowing how much you have saved in case of an emergency.

Total Your Old Bills

This one is a little less fun. Go through your old bills. Look back every month or every three months at everything you have spent money on. You will notice trends and and can figure out the average or the most you spent in the span of a few months. This way you can determined how much money you need to save every month.

Think of Upcoming Expenses

If you have tuition or a trip coming up, that will use up a chunk of the money you are making. You don’t want to spend what you don’t have. Plan for the future so you do not overspend and get blindsided.

Find How You Can Save

If you are spending more than you are bringing in, you will be out of money before you know it. The bonus of looking at your old bills is to see if you are spending too much money, and if you are then you can cut back. It’s always good to see where you’re money is going. If you don’t like what you see, you can change how you spend. Also, you can figure out a percentage of your money to save for later.

Set A Goal For Your Money

Now that you know how much money you have and how much money you are spending, you know how much money you have left. This could be spent on going out to dinner or for a more ambitious goal like buying a car or going on a trip. Plus, it never hurts to have an amount set aside in case of an emergency. 

This will keep you out of trouble with overspending and ending up in debt. More importantly, you will know how much you can spend having fun. Once you have a budget, you don’t have to worry about it and you just adjust with the big changes in your life.

Image: Sumall

CultureEducationSkillsTravel

Welcome to week two of Carpe’s “Travel Series.” This week, I share my best tips on how to travel on a budget. Having just returned from a semester in Denmark, I had the opportunity to take several trips and learn some important lessons on how to cut down costs while on the road.

TRAVELING ON A BUDGET

1. Create a budget. Before you buy tickets, book accommodations, or reserve tickets, consider how much money you will also need for food, transportation, and purchasing appropriate clothing if you do not already own it. Take in all of these factors and shape your budget around what matters most to you. If you care about staying in a hotel that is centrally located, you might need to spend less on dining out or on event or sightseeing tickets. If you care more about excursions, plan your budget around those activities. Create a simple budget spreadsheet and email it to yourself or print out a small version for easy travel access!

2. Stick to your budget! It is easy to get caught up in the excitement of being somewhere new, but if you are careless about your spending then the end of the trip will feel more like a headache than a vacation. Keep a small notepad or note in your phone documenting how much money you spend each day so you can calculate how much you have per day going forward.

3. Consider a hostel. Hostels can be a great option for cutting costs, especially if you are traveling in a group. The key element to traveling safely while staying in hostels is to check the ratings from previous guests, and to make sure that there are lockers with locks that you can rent to store your valuables. This option also works well if you are traveling with a group of 5-10 people, as most hostels have community rooms that are filled on a guest-to-guest basis. And remember to bring shower shoes, as bathrooms are often co-ed and shared by an entire floor.

4. Split with a friend. You learned it when you were young, and you’re about to hear it again: sharing is caring! Splitting meals and accommodations is great way to cut down on cost. Also consider coordinating outfits so that you can both bring half the amount of clothes and share along the way. Agree specifically on what you are willing to share before you leave for the trip or you might find yourself in an awkward position, whether it be not wanting to lend a favorite sweater or not being able to wear a pair of shoes you were counting on wearing. Talking beforehand clears up most of these problems and helps you pack more appropriately.

5. Bring a water bottle. Rather than continually buying bottles of water, bring along your own durable water bottle that you can fill with safe/clean tap water. This trick not only saves you money but helps you help the environment! Remember: you are not allowed to have any liquid in the container while going through security at the airport.

6. Use Space Saver Bags for clothing. Tip: Avoid “vacuum-seal” brands. Using space saver bags allows you to bring more variety of clothing, meaning you are less likely to splurge on an essential item you forgot to pack because you didn’t have space. I love these bags because I can fit more into a smaller space, bring a smaller bag, and travel more simply and conveniently. I’m not as worried about whether or not I will be able to fit my bags into the overhead if I’m taking a train, and having less stuff to keep an eye on means that there there’s more time for fun and less time for stress!

 How do you travel on a budget? We’d love to hear your tips!

P.S. How to stay safe when traveling.