EducationSkills

Summer will be here before you know it, and soon enough you will be getting ready to start the internship you have worked so hard to secure. Being an intern is awesome when you have opportunities to learn from your bosses, take the lead on projects, and accept important responsibilities. Before the first day of your internship, you might feel worried or anxious about being great and impressing people. You want to show your bosses that you are capable and determined, and that you will help the company succeed. You also want to learn as much as you can and grow both personally and professionally. Everyone has their own unique internship experiences and approach jobs differently. However, through our internships and the advice we’ve heard from others,  there are traits that employers look for in their interns that make them stand out apart from the others.  We like to call these awesome interns rockstars. Be yourself and do the job the way you think is best, but remember that there’s always room to grow and improve. Strive to practice these traits to not only be a rockstar intern, but to also be a better person.

1. Reliable.

Your bosses and co-workers should be able to trust you with projects they assign you. They should know that you will be early or on time, and that you will always follow through with what you say. When you are reliable, you will earn more respect and start getting more responsibilities. A rockstar intern is someone people can count on.

2. Eager to Learn.

Never stop learning. Be excited to learn a new skill or topic, and show your eagerness through energy, focus, and dedication.

3. Collaboration.

It is important to work well with others in an office environment. Work together to share ideas and drive results.

4. Hardworking.

Demonstrate how committed you are to learning and to your career. Roll up your sleeves, do every job asked of you with great care, and always volunteer to help even if something isn’t in your job description.

5. Productive.

Be efficient with your tasks. Think of ways you can be even more productive with your time, and make the most of every minute. Take ownership of your work, your day, and yourself.

6. Dedicated.

Show that you are dedicated to the company and your work by showing up early and being the last to leave. Or show that you are dedicated by bringing new ideas to your boss. When you show that you are thinking about your internship or job outside of work, it demonstrates dedication and forward thinking.

7. Take Initiative.

Be the first one to volunteer to help with something. Bring fresh ideas to your bosses before they have to ask for them. If you see something that can be better, fix it without waiting to be told to do so. Take the lead, take charge.

8. Adaptable.

Don’t be stuck in your ways when it comes to your internship or jobs. Be adaptable to situations that may unexpectedly arise, and handle it with grace. There’s no need to freak out over minor changes. Be flexible.

9. Positive Attitude.

Even when you are having a rough, sluggish, tired day, maintain a positive attitude. Rockstars look on the bright side, and their positive attitudes are infectious.

10. Honest.

Be honest about your workload, what you are accomplishing, and your thoughts. When you are secretive, people can tell. Don’t give anyone a reason to not trust you.

11. Good Communicator.

If you need help with something, ask. Don’t worry about employers questioning why they hired you if you ask for help. That won’t happen. In fact, most people want you to ask for help because they would rather the task be completed correctly rather than you not asking for help and the job being poorly done. Communicate your wins for the week, what you want to do better, and interesting industry-related news you hear or read about. Also, talk about fun things you are doing outside of the office. People won’t know who you are or what’s going on with you if you do not speak up.

12. Fun.

Regardless of whether your internship is twice a week or every day, you spend a lot of time at the office, and people want to be around other fun people. Be friendly, ask people questions about their lives, and have a good time! You don’t have to be the most outgoing person, just don’t hide away all day, do you work, and then leave when work is over. Show people your fun side, work will be awesome, and you will be a rockstar.

Skills

Steve Prefontaine, a legendary long-distance runner who has held seven American track records, said the inspirational words above. This quote reveals that we each carry a gift inside us, but to develop and utilize whatever that gift might be we must fight hard and not be afraid to give all of our effort to it.

This past Sunday I had the opportunity to partake in the Nike Women’s Half Marathon in Washington D.C. It was my very first race of any sort and it was truly one of the most rewarding experiences that I have ever had. I am by no means a trained or skilled runner, but something inside me said “Go for it!” when Nike opened up the race registration nearly seven months ago. Not only did I learn about physical limits and how to push them, but I found new ways to challenge myself mentally and emotionally as well. Leading up to summer I will be cataloging what I learned to hopefully encourage you all and be encouraged in return by your own personal stories!

Culture

When the lights went down on stage and the guitars started to hum behind the darkness, Carpe Juvenis could tell something special was about to happen. The jittery, high-strung excitement in the back room of Brooklyn’s Trash Bar was magnified by the cheers from fans and bright, random flashes of light from cell phone cameras.

As the lights went up, lead singer Connor Frost belted out the opening line of “Where Are the Children” from the debut 2012 album Sundial, and the crowd went wild. They seemed to be absorbing every note and beat of the drum, bopping and swaying to the jam. Tonight would be all about the music.

Dizzy Bats are unique because their punk-rock vocals and high-energy tempos are still relatable, enjoyable, and accessible to a listener who is unfamiliar with the intricacies and style of the genre. Take the track “These Kids I Teach,” for example, with its raw lyrics and straightforward attitude; the song has a vibe of its own that invites new listeners in and keeps the old fans wanting more.

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Following closely on the heels of his solo-West-coast tour, Frost shares with Carpe that he feels “more excitement around Dizzy Bats’ music in general” and that his latest tour “was unbelievably rewarding.” His gratitude and enthusiasm were both felt at the Girls 7” Release Party as the band opened up for the wildly popular Chicago-based funk/soul/rhythm group whysowhite.

Carpe dug around for some behind-the-show information and found out that each set list is fine tuned to take the audience on a ride. There is a certain “ebb and flow” Frost creates to hype the listeners up, mellow them out a bit, and then “amp the crowd back up” as he finished with a popular tune that everyone has been waiting for. That last song at this show was “Appendectomy” from the 2013 album release with the same name.

Something special is happening with Dizzy Bats – with a brand new album coming out this year and a quality sound making its way across the country, this band is not one to miss out on. Check them out at Bandcamp and iTunes.

Make sure to “Like” Dizzy Bats on Facebook to keep up-to-date on everything Dizzy Bats related!

EducationHigh SchoolTravel

For those of you who are about to embark on spring break or are still anticipating the sweet arrival for a long needed rest, here are some ways to relax while still remaining productive!

1)   Grab your calendar. Spend thirty minutes writing down everything you need to keep track of for the rest of the semester. For example, pull out your classes’ syllabi and mark down when assignments are due and when exams are taking place. Having everything marked visually in one place give you a good sense of what is coming up – stress less and take time for fun!

2)   Volunteer. If you are at home and looking for something to do, consider donating your time to volunteerism. Not only will you be doing good in the neighborhood, but you will have the opportunity to learn something new about your community. Check out Volunteer Match to start helping!

3)   Work out. In between your classes, friends, exams, homework, eating, sleeping, etc., it can be difficult to find time for exercise. Whether you go on a run, sign up for a trial-period at a nearby gym, or spend an hour outside doing yoga, take some time and sweat it out!

4)   Find a job or internship. This is easier said than done, but with just three months until summer it is a good idea to begin applying within the next few weeks. Websites like Intern Sushi and The Muse are great places to start the hunt!

5)   Rest. Your body needs to rest. Don’t feel bad about sleeping in or taking the mid-day nap you never have time for at school. After midterms your body is likely in need of some rest and relaxation.

If you are going on a trip with friends or family make sure to check out our tips on how to stay safe while traveling and have an awesome break!

 

Image credit: www.2013yearoflettering.tumblr.com

CultureExploreTravel

 TRAVEL SERIES

Traveling comes in all forms. Whether you are taking a one-week road trip or flying across an ocean to reach your destination, visiting new places is an integral part of learning about yourself and others. Seeing how different people live, work, and experience life helps break down the barriers between us and reveals that perhaps we are not all as different as we might have thought.

This travel series will cover a wide range of topics about how to travel, where to travel to, etc. Tune in next week for traveling on a budget. Let’s get going!

STAYING SAFE

 1. Be aware of your surroundings. This does not mean you should be paranoid, but rather be aware of who is around you and be conscientious of anything that seems unusual or strange.

 2. Watch your pockets. The smallest details will make the biggest difference. For instance, it is always a good idea to keep valuables such as your wallet, keys, phone, and identification (passport, drivers license) in a hard-to-reach pocket. This is to prevent pick-pocketing or accidentally allowing a precious item to drop from your bag without realizing it.

 3. Tell someone where you are going. It is always a good idea to inform a close friend or family member of your travel plans. If something unexpected happens it is essential that somebody knows where you are and has a way to reach you in the case of an emergency. If you are traveling alone this is a crucial part of your planning, and is beneficial for you and also the people who care about you. If you are traveling with other people, this is still a good idea and highly recommended.

 4.  Keep extra cash hidden on you. It is always a smart idea to keep about twenty dollars of whichever currency you need on you at all times for those “just in case” moments. Tuck the bill(s) into a small pocket of your jacket or bag. Perhaps you get lost in a city and it becomes dark out – if you feel unsafe or have no idea how to get back to where you are staying, having that spare cash will likely enable you to grab a taxi and get home safely.

 5. Decide on a meeting spot. If you are traveling with others, consider choosing a central meeting spot where you can go if someone loses the group or visits somewhere on their own. A good meeting point is one that is well-known by locals so you can ask for directions and is also typically busy during both the day and night in case a member of the group is waiting by him or herself.

 6. Have information. This step will take you about 10-15 minutes, but it is well worth the hassle. Go through your itinerary and write down or type in all phone numbers of hotels and friends you are staying with, addresses of your accommodations, and emergency numbers of whoever city you are traveling to. Having this information might help you enjoy yourself because you can concentrate on having fun rather than trying to remember where you need to go at the end of the day! Also consider writing down all flight, train, or car reservation information ahead of time and print any tickets you will need. Store these in a safe and secure spot in your luggage.

In order to travel as stress-free as possible, it is essential that you plan. Like most situations, planning is the key to success. Spending 30 minutes going over these safety tips and collecting important information will save you hours of stress, confusion, and anxiety during your adventure!

Check out Travel Series Part II: Traveling on a Budget and Travel Series Part III: Choosing the Destination!

EducationExploreSkillsSpotlightTravel

Alternative Education Highlight: High Mountain Institute

Education comes in all shapes and sizes; there has never been a “one size fits all” when it comes to learning. Figuring out how you learn best is a challenge that you should continue to tackle until you discover what works best for you personally. Carpe Juvenis recently sat down with Megan Morrow, High Mountain Institute (HMI) alum, to talk about the high school semester program she took part in her junior year. Megan now studies at Johns Hopkins University where she majors in Global Environmental Change & Sustainability.

HMI is a program for academically driven high school students interested in an outdoor educational experience. HMI focuses on building students’ relationships with nature and their community through full physical and emotional integration. Based in Colorado, students take AP level place-based classes in tangent with learning survival and camping skills. There is a campus with off-the-grid cabins and fully functioning classrooms where students live and study when they are not busy leading hiking expeditions and camping explorations.

HMI offers a range of programs: Semester, Summer team, Apprentice Program, High Peaks Adventure, and Wilderness Medicine and Avalanche Safety courses. If you’re interested in applying to HMI, click here – applications for Fall 2014, Spring 2015, and Summer Term 2014 are due February 15, 2014.

Without further ado, we’d like to introduce you to Megan Morrow. Read on to learn more about her experiences at High Mountain Institute!

Carpe Juvenis: What exactly is High Mountain Institute?

Megan Morrow: High Mountain Institute (HMI) is an outdoor education program combined with experiential education. There are around fifty students from around the United States and you go on a set of three backpacking expeditions that are interspersed throughout the semester. You take normal classes that you would in school but you continue them when you’re on your hiking trips.

CJ: Would you recommend that someone apply to HMI and why?

MM: Yes, definitely! I was really hesitant to go and spent the entire month after I got in deciding whether or not I wanted to go. I actually replied late saying I would. But [HMI] helps prepare you for going away to college because you’ve already done it before for four months, and being in a small community forces you to deal with people. But [the staff] also teaches you about conflict resolution, getting along with people, and working with group dynamics. Its something I never thought I would be able to do … but being able to spend more than a month in the Colorado and Utah wilderness is amazing. I would have never been able to do that in my regular high school.

CJ: What is a challenge or difficulty you faced that took you by surprise?

MM: I expected that I would be homesick – and I was – but I got over it. The hardest struggle for me that I didn’t expect was that it took me a really long time to adjust back into real life again. I got so close to the people [at HMI] that I had a really hard time going back to school.

CJ: How did you feel about the academic aspect of HMI?

MM: The academics I think are really, really good. You have scheduled time to do work every night for two hours. [And work is continued on hiking trips] so you’ll have English class discussing Henry David Thoreau, or you have to do a science lab on your expedition walking around looking at trees, collecting data, writing essays, and all that. The other component is leadership training; you go over types of leadership, how to be a good leader, and you have to be “leader of the day” twice throughout an expedition where you lead your small group of students and you have to use topographical maps and make decisions about when to rest and how far to walk. As expeditions go by you become more and more independent.

CJ: Is there a certain “type” of student that should go to HMI?

MM: I think it definitely helps to be an outdoorsy person, but it was a mixture of people. It’s been interesting to see how [the students in my semester] have all grown up through college because we’re not all the same type of person. I think what’s interesting about something that [happens] in high school is that I was still young enough that it helped mold me. I was young enough to not come into it with such a strong identity that I wasn’t willing to be changed by it. I was sixteen when I went.

CJ: Has HMI stuck with you in any way?

MM: That’s actually where I started getting interested in environmental science. It’s a natural science program there so we would do water tests near old mines and learn about pollution and go to logging areas and learn about the succession.

Carpe Juvenis would like to thank Megan for her time and insight about HMI! For more information about this awesome person, check out her study abroad blog, as well as her professional blog

Photos courtesy of Megan Morrow