Skills

We’ve all been there – the weekend finally rolls around but you still have items on your To-Do list and you can’t shake the nagging feeling that you should be doing more. Whether you’re in school, working at a company, or self-employed, there’s always a way to feel like you could be filling your weekends up with work instead of fun (or anything but work). But choosing to let your academic or professional career dominate your life might not be the smartest, healthiest, or most productive way to live.

It turns out that over-working yourself can lead to a higher risk of depression, a disrupted sleep schedule, extreme eye strain, and loads of unnecessary stress. So as tempting as it may be to lock yourself in Friday though Sunday, reconsider that decision using these seven tips.

  1. Prioritize your To-Do list. If your To-Do list is still full by Friday afternoon, take ten minutes to prioritize the items. Consider what must be done that day, and what can wait until Monday. Break your big list down into a few small ones labeled by day, and if you absolutely have to get something work-related done on the weekend limit yourself to just two items. Otherwise, write them in for Monday or Tuesday.
  2. Make plans with someone. Force yourself to step away from work by making plans with another person. The more pressure you put on yourself to fulfill a promise, the more likely you are to follow through with it. Text or call a friend you haven’t seen in a while (and preferably not someone you work with or the conversation might steer back to work and trigger stress) and set a time to walk around outside or grab a meal. You’ll be less tempted to sit inside if someone else is depending on you. Set a specific time and confirm your hangout near the end of the work or school week.
  3. Have something to look forward to. If you don’t feel like seeing other people, you should still find something that you can look forward to. Block out time during the weekend to go to a concert, try a new restaurant, get some errands done, or go to the park and walk a few laps. Actually write down the time and activity you’re going to do in your notebook or iCal.
  4. Pre-schedule emails and posts. Technology is a necessary evil. Luckily there are ways to schedule emails and posts ahead of time so that you aren’t always logging-in to hit “send.” Carve out an extra hour each week to get ahead on writing emails that need to be sent the following week, and pre-write Tweets, posts, and messages that can be scheduled ahead of time.
  5. Figure out your stress-triggers. Think super honestly about the things that stress you out the most. Maybe it’s having a looming deadline for that term paper, or wanting to rehearse your business pitch a few more times. Whatever those triggers may be, address them and write them down in a safe place. Once they’ve been written down you’re less likely to forget what you need to do. Keeping tasks in your head instead of on paper is a great way to bottle up anxiety about potentially forgetting to do something. Be honest about what can wait, and what needs to get done now.
  6.  Turn off your technology. Press the off button. Shut your computer down. Turn off your phone or leave it at home. Even if it’s just for one afternoon, giving your eyes and fingers a break from the screen and keyboard will do you a world of good. It’s the simplest and most effective way to disconnect from your classmates, professors, and bosses. Limit yourself to checking your phone once a day, and shut it off again when you’re done.

It’s not always the easiest thing to step away from our professional and academic responsibilities, but giving yourself a break means you’re making a decision to invest into your long term health. The better care you take of your body and mind, the more stamina you’ll have to succeed.

Image: StokPic

EducationHealth

College can be overwhelming, and with so much to do it can be difficult to figure out how to balance all the activities and obligations you come across. Managing the 3 S’s takes practice and organization on your own accord, but here are some tips to help you get on track!

1. Your Schedule

Choose wisely when picking what times to have your classes. It’s always a smart idea to have your classes earlier in the day. Though you may miss out on sleeping in until lunch, having morning classes will give you more than enough time to get your homework done before dinner time!

2. Plan in Advanced

If you know that an event is coming up when you want to hang out with friends, make sure that you have all your work done and your evening free. It’s a good idea to save socializing for later in the day so you can have all of your work already done. Another good time to hang out with friends is on the weekends!

3. Don’t Stay Out All Night

We’re all bound to have our share of all-nighters, but doing it all the time isn’t a smart idea. Your friends will still be there in the morning, so take it upon yourself to set your own bedtime. If you know you have an early class, make sure you get your beauty sleep so you’re awake and ready to pay attention. This doesn’t mean don’t have fun, but keep in mind your obligations in order to keep everything going smoothly.

4. Write Things Down

Whether it’s in your phone or an agenda, write down when assignments are due and when you have plans. This way you know when you need to study and how to fit other things into your schedule. It’s important to keep track of everything!

Of course, figuring out how to balance your college life is a process of trial and error. Make sure to keep in mind your priorities but to also have fun! Staying focused, organized, and dedicated are the key steps to balancing the 3 S’s as you journey through your college career.

Image: Steven S., Flickr