Professional SpotlightSpotlight

When we first saw Alexander Chinnici’s film reel, we were blown away. You hear a lot about actors, actresses, and directors, but rarely do you know a lot about those who are in charge of the artistic and technical aspect of the image, the cinematographer. Having watched movies such as Aliens, Predator, and Apocalypse Now growing up, Alex learned early on good films can influence you. Alex pursued film in college and by the time he graduated, he knew that cinematography was what he was most passionate about.

Alex is thoughtful in his artistic and technical approaches. He emphasizes the importance of building a solid foundation of knowledge and technical expertise, as well as highlights the value of collaboration, whether it’s with directors, producers, or the team he manages. These days, Alex spends a great deal of time on airplanes traveling between coasts for shoots. We were fortunate to meet Alex before he jet off for another shoot the next day, and he shared with us what it means to be a cinematographer, what films and which directors deeply influence him, and how he seizes his youth.

Name: Alexander Chinnici
Education: Film and Video; Cinematography from the School of Visual Arts
Follow: AlexChinnici.com

Carpe Juvenis: How do you define ‘Seizing Your Youth’?

Alexander Chinnici: Seizing Your Youth, to me, means “breaking convention.” First off, youth is subjective in and of itself. To me, a child, a teenager, or even someone in their early 20s is expected to do certain things. Depending on where they’re from, their race, gender, etc. …It’s expected that they do certain, specific things that are molded for them before they’re even born. Seizing that is about control. You can do whatever you want; you just have to want it badly enough.

For some people the stakes are much higher and the obstacles may be much greater, but anything is possible. I don’t mean to make it sound easy – sometimes it is, some people are born privileged. For others it can be very difficult. I’m very fortunate that I didn’t really experience that difficulty. Seizing Your Youth is about taking control of what’s yours and not giving in to conventions. They’re usually connected to fear and it ultimately hurts our culture. I’m very lucky to have grown up in a home and an environment that encouraged the opposite of convention. I have very little patience for excuses. Seizing Your Youth is about throwing those excuses away and taking control of what you want.

CJ: You majored in Film and Video with a concentration in Cinematography from the School of Visual Arts. How did you decide what to major in?

AC: The School of Visual Arts Film & Video program is set-up in such a way that your first year is an overall review of the general aspects of the film industry. They teach you the basics, but most importantly you can get your hands on cameras and just shoot away. At the end of the first year you have to choose a focus: Directing, Writing, Editing, Cinematography, etc.

My friends and I made many movies together in high school – basically since 6th grade – and I naturally gravitated to the camera. (I should also mention that my Dad is a photographer). Toward the end of high school we got more and more serious. After three of us went to SVA together, I naturally took over when it came to the camera. 16mm was introduced into our lives and we were terrified (“Wait, you can’t see what you’re doing!?”)

I can’t really say why, but when students in the class (and my collaborators and best friends from high school) asked “Can someone shoot my film?” I jumped at the chance. I had never shot film before and admittedly I was very scared of it. At the time I was struggling with the idea of becoming a director simply because in the world of film you’re told that’s exactly what you should be, especially in film school. Not having full control worried me but in the end I continued to gravitate toward the camera. This was also my first experience with lighting. I simply had no clue about it beforehand and now a brand new language was being introduced to me.

Combine the romance of film (like a first love), discovering the language that is constant lighting, my natural instinct, and the older thesis students telling me that graduating without a focused skill would mean certain death led me to the choice of majoring in Cinematography. Needless to say it was the right choice. It is a skill that takes a lifetime to learn and I plan on doing just that.

You are also a cinematographer for narrative and commercial work. What does it mean to be a cinematographer? What do your daily tasks look like?

AC: The Cinematographer is in charge of the overall visual language for the project. It is always this person’s task to put story first and foremost with the directors vision in mind at all times, to serve them, and to collaborate with them (the amount is usually dictated by the director). Consistency is also very important; making sure that the style stays consistent throughout and only changes when necessary. A cinematographer is one part technical, one part artistic. It is a wonderful meeting of the two. The goal is to achieve an image that the audience doesn’t think about. The technical becomes hidden in the background and the emotion of the image takes shape, hopefully affecting the audience in the exact way that the two of you conceived. In my personal opinion, this is when it is most effective.

The Cinematographer works with other department heads to strive for that consistency. Collaborating with them is extremely important and I try my best to make this happen each and every time. They’ve also spoken with the director and usually we’re all on the same page. We work hard to make the director’s vision come true, but we’re hired as the experts in each of our respected fields. We’re also usually hired because of a particular ability, style, technical know-how or even personality. We spend a lot of time together on set; you have to respect and trust the people you’re around. It is filled with constant decision-making and compromise. Those tasks are not easy if you don’t get along.

My daily tasks depend on what’s going on with the project. While in pre-production, my life is about preparing for production. Seeing locations with the director, locking in my crew, shaping the schedule with the AD and working within the budget constraints. I do my best to squeeze the most out of the amount that’s been allotted to me. The director and I work closely to discover the style of the film. We may watch films; review photos or works of art, discovering the right references helps us get on the same page. We also work hard to choose the correct camera and lenses. This is based on a desired look, the budget and specific logistics often shaped by the script. Often we compare past experiences and watch projects shot with similar combinations. The camera and lenses is arguably the most important choice before we get to set.

On set my daily tasks are always very different each and every day. That is one of the most exciting aspects of the job. To be broad I’d say that it usually begins with a strong plan that we had settled on the day (or days) before. I meet with the Assistant Director (AD) and the director to discuss said plan and we see if we can improve it. Or if a disaster has struck, how do we deal with it? If I’m lucky the AD will get a blocking rehearsal going and we can watch the scene. This will inform everyone of what’s happening. Not every set is so organized, but when it is you can do your job much better. I’ll quickly review this with the heads of my team and they’ll delegate and convey what needs to happen to their crew. After that it often comes down to maintaining a groove, time is extremely important on set.

We usually have 12 hours per day to get everything we need. We face many obstacles like the movement of the sun, actors and/or actresses becoming restless, locations only allowing a certain amount of time, etc. The clock is always running and you have to race against it. It’s often my job to keep us on track and constantly make sure that the shooting order is correct. I need to be thinking five shots ahead at all times. While this is happening I’m placing the camera in the correct place for said moment, with the correct focal length and such. These decisions are often shaped by the location and the blocking of the actors. I work simultaneously with the Gaffer on the lighting of the scene.

Moving a camera around is one thing but lighting a set or a real location can become very complicated. The two are strongly connected and affect one another greatly. The order of how all of this works must be taken into account. The director and I often discuss the editing as well. How is this scene going to take shape? This certainly informs the decisions we make. “Making our day” as we call it is extremely important. If we love the footage and we’ve made it, it’s considered a success. My day is about making those two things happen.

Alex E

CJ: When you’re on set, what aspects of the story and the characters’ movements do you have to consider? At what point do you come in – has the scene blocking been done, do you work with them while doing that?

AC: I think it’s very important that everyone witnesses the blocking rehearsal. Doing any job well is about education. Without knowing what’s happening, you’re only guessing. This only wastes precious time and ultimately hurts many aspects of the day. I often find myself compromising simply due to a poor management of time on someone else’s part. It eats into my shooting time, thus forcing myself to set-up faster. It also forces the director to make faster decisions, do less takes, etc.

To answer your question, no, I am not that involved in the blocking. It is a time for the actors and director to thoroughly discuss the scene and to discover new things. We always come in with a strong plan but you quickly realize that certain things won’t work. You must be nimble and quickly change your approach. Sometimes it’s the location and sometimes it’s the blocking. Often the scene gets much better. If you have a specific idea that you come in with you can manipulate the situation to fall into it. This happens sometimes and it is usually a technical approach that can be effective. It’s important for us to know the difference between the two and when not to get in the way. I constantly try to pick my battles and know when the blocking of a scene has gotten better for the story and/or actors. If a “baby” of mine has to go, then so be it. The scene is usually much better this way. However, I will step in when necessary but only after they’ve discussed it a few times.

As for the characters’ movements and such, this is usually determined by the directors and actors discussions that they’ve had before and even throughout the scene. I often work around this and find a lot of inspiration from it. When an actor is cast so well you inherently trust them right away. If you’re fast enough, you can keep up and come up with new ideas on the spot based on what they’re doing. They know the character better than you so you better trust them and revolve the ideas around that. I always have the story in mind. The director, actors, and I will often collaborate on what’s happening in the scene since they constantly affect one another. With that said, marks can be very important, especially when it comes to lighting. Unfortunately, we’re in a time right now where the craft is being threatened due to the ability of how fast the cameras are and their ability to work so well with natural light. I believe that a combination of the two is the best recipe. Take advantage of what the new technology has allowed us to do, but don’t lose sight of the potential that film language holds. I see A LOT of movies nowadays that simply ignore that. They excuse their lack of ability, low budget, and poor planning as a “style” that is just plain bad.

I do personally like a moving camera (when necessary of course), but I do my best to make sure that the movement is correct for that particular moment. It can be hand-held, a dolly, a Steadicam, a jib, etc. …These are all tools that convey different emotions. It’s up to us to choose what’s right and to execute it correctly. This is directly affected by the blocking and that dance can be one of my favorite parts about cinematography.

CJ: When starting a new project, what does your process look like?

AC: I read the script a few times so that I can have shorthand with directors. You better bet that they know it a whole lot better, and they’ll feel a lot more comfortable if you know it well. This also helps me make fast decisions later on. I need to be very close to it, I need to care about it very much. When my instincts take over, they’re often the right ones because I know it so well and I care about it so much.

I like to meet with the director often. Getting into their head is very important for me. I need to have a very good understanding of what they want. Most aren’t that technical so they describe things in broad strokes. I have to be careful because I may take one sentence as meaning a very specific technical solution, but the director may mean something else entirely. I’m not at a point of being able to afford tests in pre-pro, so if I read that incorrectly we’ll often find out when it’s too late.

Showing examples and explaining things thoroughly often solves any issues. But it’s my goal to learn these things so that when we’re on set I can turn from the eyepiece and say “You happy?” When a director looks back with a huge smile, you know that you did your job right. I love that moment and I strive for it. I trust my director and if that smile is genuine then I know that we’re doing good work together. Ultimately that leads to a good movie, which is always the goal.

CJ: What is the most difficult part about being a cinematographer? The best part?

AC:  The most difficult part about being a cinematographer is the lack of control. You’re constantly striving to achieve as much of it as possible, but it’s constantly slipping through your hands. You have to pick your battles and know what (and when) to fight for what you feel is necessary to have control over. At times it can be liberating and exciting, your old ideas become new ones, often better ones. However, it can also crush your ability to do your job well. But if good people surround you and if you’ve come fully prepared and made the right decisions beforehand, you should be able to avoid this issue. Filmmaking is about constant compromise and working to react the right way so that you can make the most of it.

The best part about being a cinematographer is that you have the chance to live many lives. This is actually a direct quote from filmmaker Robert Altman. It’s stuck with me for years. I constantly travel, meet many different people from all walks of life, and immerse myself in the subject matter, which educates me and opens the way I look at the world. Sometimes the projects are set in different time periods and I get the chance to live in that time between action and cut. It also just feels right; many pieces have to come together. When you witness the best take you see all of your planning come together to make a great shot or sequence, its incredible exciting. We work in a 3-dimensional space for a 2-dimensional presentation that has constant movement. It’s absolutely fascinating. It’s the best job in the world.

Alex B

CJ: What should a young adult who wants to be a cinematographer do now to set him or herself up for success?

AC: This is said pretty often but it’s true…shoot, shoot, shoot. Pick up a camera and go for it. The beauty of film school is that it gives you the freedom to fail. You have the equipment, the faculty and the crew ready to make anything and everything. Unfortunately, at the time the projects are naturally seen as the most important thing in the world. It’s hard to understand at the time, but the stakes are actually very low and this should be taken advantage of.

With that said don’t ignore the technical knowledge that’s needed. It’s great that anyone can get their hands on a camera, see the results immediately, make a decision, and be able to hit the record button for very cheap. But it’s so easy that it has put the technical know-how at risk. It has simply made people lazy. This element is essential since it is directly connected to the creative decisions that you make. You simply cannot pull off certain techniques without understanding how and why and what tools you need to do so. Not to mention the time and cost it takes. It’s one thing to be able to shoot, but to be able to manage a crew, understand a budget and run a set…that’s really what a Director of Photography (DP) is, it’s not only about having a good eye. You’re the head of a very important department that interacts with everyone at all times. You can’t be an introvert behind your small camera. If you want to be a real DP, you need to learn how to delegate and manage. Film school allows for this experience early on.

I’d also recommend purchasing a photo camera. Learn how everything affects one other. First learn the different aspects of the camera. Shoot in manual and experiment with different ISO’s, apertures, shutter angles, color temperature, and focal lengths. You can learn all of them specifically with something you can carry in your bag. With digital, you can see the results right away. Once you start to truly understand these aspects you can try different combinations and understand how they affect one another.

Editing in Lightroom or Photoshop is also very important since color correction is a huge part of my job that I take very seriously. Actual movement and frame-rate can’t really be understood as well when practicing this, but the other aspects can be constantly educational throughout your day. You can learn A LOT from photography, certainly the basics. You need a good foundation to become good at anything.

It’s just as important to educate yourself as much as possible. Actually shooting is the best form of education but you also need to read about it. Get a subscription to the American Society of Cinematographers magazine and the International Cinematographers Guild magazine and read it front to back. Google everything you don’t understand. At first it will be very daunting, but in time you will start to understand more and more. There are many blogs and websites that discuss all sorts of aspects of cinematography and you can learn a lot from them.

I’d also tell them to consider film-school. I have issues with the current model – it’s very behind and needs a major revamp. The film industry has changed drastically and they haven’t caught up. However, I still advocate going and making the most of it. Trust me, the school will fail you in certain ways but you can get A LOT out of it and that is only up to you. I’ve met some of my best collaborators through film school and that was worth the cost alone. It really is an industry that depends on who you know. That’s not just a saying.

Oh and shoot film at least a few times. Trust me.

CJ: What are the three top skills you need as a cinematographer?

AC: This is the hardest question for me to answer since I think it requires many skills. Some will probably disagree with me, but I think these are the top three: Lighting, Camera placement/Focal Length, and Management skills.

Lighting: To understand the use of constant light is absolutely essential for a good cinematographer. Personally, it’s what defines the difference between the good and the great. Lighting sets the mood, time, genre, and emotion among many other things. Of course the camera can convey these things as well, but I believe that lighting is the most powerful aspect of conveying the visual image that you set and the director set out to make. I could go on for many pages, I should just stop here…

Camera Placement / Focal Length: This involves the director much more but you usually place the camera exactly where you think it should be. The director often has a very clear idea of what they want to see and when they want to see it, but it’s up to us to execute it correctly. A lot of my skill and talent is in executing these ideas well. The right camera placement comes down to millimeters; I’m very specific and exact about this placement. I often start with the farthest background, usually a wall or vista that I simply can’t change. This is because I can usually move everything else to make it work in the composition that I’m striving for. Focal length plays a huge part in this and I will often discuss this with the director. Some are very specific while others simply don’t know, luckily apps like ‘Artemis’ allow me to show them a rough idea very quickly. Depending on the format that you’re shooting (S35, Full-frame, 16mm, etc.) and your focal length combination can lead to many, many different choices. Every shot is different and discovering them is always a blast. I haven’t even mentioned moving shots and editing which greatly affect the above choices. But again, I’ll stop right here.

Management skills: This is overlooked a lot of the time in articles and write ups on Cinematography. It is one of the most important aspects of the job. You’re running a big crew and constantly interacting with the other departments. You also need to play politician before, during, and after the shoot with the production team. You need confidence and you need to be able to delegate. Surrounding yourself with a good crew can make this part of the job much easier. Plus, if they’re great they can make you look really good!

CJ: What films or which directors have inspired your filming style and work?

AC: When I was roughly six years old my Dad showed me all sorts of movies I probably shouldn’t have seen: Aliens, Terminator 1 & 2, Predator, etc. It completely blew me away, but I was hooked. At that time I only thought of movies as very basic genres. Of course I couldn’t articulate this at the time but it was simple: Disney movies, action movies, scary movies, funny movies, etc. On our large, rear projection TV in the basement he eventually showed me one of his favorites (on laser disc!), Francis Ford Coppola’s Apocalypse Now. I was probably 8 years old? I had no clue what I had just seen but I fell deeply in love with it. This was unlike any movie I had ever seen. I couldn’t categorize it; the intrigue was through the roof. The film is shot by Vittorio Storaro (one of the masters of color) and he’s one of my personal favorites. I personally didn’t truly understand cinematography until the year I graduated college but the moment I saw it and all throughout the years in between the film stuck with me for some reason. I love it for many reasons, but I know for a fact that it had a lot to do with the cinematography. Coppola and Storaro’s collaboration is one of the reasons I do what I do and it had an effect on me from an early age.

Stanley Kubrick, Paul Thomas Anderson, David Fincher, The Coen Brothers and Quentin Tarantino are probably my favorites. I’m aware that this is a very modern, American list. My film knowledge is pretty good, but it certainly pales to some people that I know. But from the films that I’ve personally seen those people have really shaped my education, love, and approach to filmmaking. I think of them very often while making decisions and I constantly study their work.

Kubrick is my first love, and I love Paul Thomas Anderson for his incredible story-telling and use of the anamorphic format (don’t get me started, I’m nuts for it!), Fincher for his absolutely perfect execution, The Coen Brothers for being so unique every single time, and Tarantino for having the most fun. I don’t think anyone enjoys his or her job more than that guy and it comes through. I love that and I want my work to feel the same way.

Recently my girlfriend and I watched Billy Wilder’s The Apartment on Netflix. It was shot Panavision, anamorphic in 1960 by Joseph LaShelle. The compositions and camera movement were simply perfect. The use of the anamorphic format was lovely. Rarely do we see modern filmmakers hold wide shots for that long, it’s a shame. After the film ended, Netflix suggested we watch Billy Wilder’s Sabrina, another favorite of ours. Of course we couldn’t say no. Shot by the brilliant Charles Lang in 1954 and in academy 35 (a more square frame), this film was done perfectly as well. Both films we’re directed by Billy Wilder roughly six years apart, both using two completely different formats. Both were shot in lovely black and white but by two different DP’s. What we witnessed was a master at work. Wilder completely mastered both formats and used their strengths wonderfully. The locations, the sets, the blocking, everything was completely different but worked so well. Watching them back-to-back was very educational and inspiring. I highly recommend it.

Last but not least I need to mention Star Wars. Specifically The Empire Strikes Back. There’s not much to say here other than “Thanks George.”

CJ: What is your favorite book?

AC: The Road by Cormac McCarthy.

CJ: What advice would you give your 20-year-old self?

AC: Take more risks, loosen up, and experiment more. At the time I took each project very seriously, I always have and always will, and I don’t regret that. But in school I could have experimented more with different film stocks, techniques, and especially different lighting techniques and approaches. I could have done shoots on my own more often and simply played around more. By now I feel that I have discovered most of what I would have. But I simply would have learned it earlier thus effecting projects from years ago that could have been more well shot.

My brother is very involved in the world of racing and there’s a saying called “seat time.” It amounts to how much time you’ve sat in a racecar and actually performed in a race. Seat time is very important with any skill. I always want more and I only get better each and every time. I’m very hard on my work and I’m very rarely satisfied. It can always be better, always. The more seat time, the better.

Alexander C Qs

Images: Carpe Juvenis

Professional SpotlightSpotlight

We discovered Moni Yael Garcia by happy universal chance. While stumbling through the internet we landed on an amazing site called Real Heroines and were immediately mesmerized. The graphics, the stories, the layout – everything captured our attention and we needed to know who the mastermind behind it was. We are excited to introduce Moni Yael Garcia, freelance designer, illustrator, and entrepreneur extraordinaire! From web design, to photography, to mobile, to identity development, Moni does it all (and makes it look effortless!). We asked Moni to describe her work as a self-starter and where her life and creative inspiration comes from.

Name: Moni Yael Garcia
Occupation: Freelance Designer and Illustrator
Age: 27
Education: University of Texas at Austin
Follow Moni: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Dribbble

Carpe juvenis: How do you define “Seizing Your Youth”?

Moni Yael Garcia: Enjoying your time as an individual where responsibilities are few and self exploration leads to personal epiphanies.

 CJ: What originally drew you to design and illustration?

MYG: I’ve always had an interest in art and drawing. Even before kindergarten I would sculpt roses out of Play-Doh and dinosaurs out of aluminum foil. I really enjoyed experimenting with colors and drawing what I saw in picture books. I found these things relaxing and the only way to accurately understand myself and the world around me. I never considered design or illustration as a sustainable form of living. I went through various career choices from grade school to high school, and becoming an artist was never something I considered possible. Even though both my parents are creative individuals their careers have followed more traditional paths. Luckily, I came across the “graphic designer” occupation during a career research project for my 11th grade BCIS class. That’s when all my tension on choosing a career dissipated, and I finally had a direction I could wholeheartedly follow.

CJ: After graduating from University of Texas in Austin you struggled to find footing in the professional world – what made you decide to invest your time into late night tutorials and, in hindsight, was it worth it?

MYG: Late night tutorials were the only thing that kept me sane after graduating from UT. It was such a tough time for me. I couldn’t find a job for almost a year due to the competitive nature of the industry and the recession. The majority of places were under a hiring freeze and if they were looking for new employees, having no experience in the field just didn’t cut it. I only had one real internships under my belt and my skill level was bare minimum. Don’t get me wrong, my education in the University of Texas Design Program helped me immensely and gave me an understanding of design, the importance of concepts and the creative process. However, I needed more experience and a chance to level up my abilities as a designer. I actually treasure these obstacles now. They drove me to push through, take initiative, and reevaluate my goals.

moni-interview2

CJ: What was the main trigger that made you realize that the corporate environment wasn’t for you?

MYG: I would say the differences in our creative process. The pay was great, and the hours were predictable, but I found myself constantly frustrated in the way things were approached. Then after several months of trying to make it work I had a heart to heart with myself. Would I be happy working there for the next five years — heck even two? Did I see myself growing into the designer I wanted to be or would I fall into complacency? Would it be okay to go to a job that I would eventually come to hate every day? I saw no progress in site and that’s when I decided to make a change professionally.

CJ: What inspired you to create a personal website, and how has that affected you professionally?

MYG: The reason I decided to create my own personal website instead of using a standard template was because I felt it necessary. I wanted to showcase my work, creative skills, and personal story in an unconventional manner. I was ready to step out of my current situation and become a full-time freelancer. It was definitely a challenge filled with stress during the whole process, but ultimately I knew it would lead to my new identity. I strongly encourage all creatives to have their own website, or at least some form of a digital portfolio where they have the ability to showcase their own work. Behance, Cargo Collective, and WordPress are great places to start if developing your own custom website from scratch isn’t possible.

CJ: Can you please tell us more about your volunteerism work with the Boys and Girls Club Holthouse?

MYG: Well, for a couple of years I had the opportunity to share my Fridays with a group of 7 to 11 year olds at one of the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Houston. I wanted to make the most out of my visits with these kids, so we set up “Club Tech”, in which we covered business, art, design, programming, and robotics. Basically everything I learned during and after college. I wholeheartedly believe it’s important to give back to others who may not have certain opportunities or resources available to them due to circumstances out of our control. Exposing younger generations to these subjects early in their development sets them up for success. I really tried to create a curriculum that encouraged creativity and problem solving. At times it was difficult to motivate them through a project though, since they already had a long week of school, but they were real troopers. Some of our favorite activities were, creating business cards for their fictional business, building real working cardboard robots, 3D printing figurines, and designing their own computer game. As long as I was able to open up a new world for one of those kids, I’m happy.

CJ: What advice would you give to younger artists/designers/illustrators who are still studying their craft?

MYG:  Five things. 1) Don’t overlook the history of your profession. It’s always a good idea to study the basics and build a strong foundation. 2) Dissect the world around you and don’t be afraid to recreate work you find inspiring. (Just don’t claim it as your own!) 3) Explore different concepts and techniques that spark your interest by jotting them down and finessing them through whatever medium necessary. 4) The more you make the more you learn. It’s easy to get discouraged when you’re in a competitive field, but nobody starts awesome. You need time to develop your skills and even find your passion. 5) Posting your process on a social media outlet is a great way to document your journey and can even help you land possible internships or jobs.

I think if you keep these things in mind you’ll be able to find your own voice and make great things.

CJ: How do you create and maintain a work-life balance?

MYG: Honestly, I’m still working on that. As a sole proprietor it’s up to you to find work, manage clients, execute projects, and develop your business. It can be stressful and rewarding at the sametime. My personal time almost always relates to my business time, though indirectly. Whether it be daily exercise to get my creative juices flowing, hiking expeditions as a form of self reflection, designing products for my online shop that require a more personal approach, and even sleeping to work through mental blocks. I like to use this time as fuel for what I do and want to accomplish. As I see it, let the way you live your life dictate how you approach your work.

CJ: As a self-starter, how do you keep yourself on-track with goals and deadlines?

MYG: Having a scattered “To-Do” list with no unforeseen end can be daunting. That’s why I’ve switched over to organize my priorities with a project checklist where I have the flexibility to assign daily, weekly, and monthly tasks. I plan out all my client work and personal projects in Producteev, a free online management software, and move on to display my weekly and daily tasks throughout my workspace. I’m a very visual person so seeing things I have to accomplish outside of the screen and on my whiteboardand post-it notes keeps me focused. Overall this process allows me to change between projects and stay productive when I’m burnt out with one in particular.

Moni Garcia QsCJ: Where did your love for women’s rights come from?

MYG: I can’t really pin point where my strong interest for women’s rights came from, but I’ve always been fond of encouraging others to reach their full potential, whether they be women, men, boys or girls. We’re all human and treating someone poorly due to gender, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, disability, or social status is baffling. Equality encourages a future of strong innovative thinkers and leaders, better economy, more creativity — not wanting everyone to be equal is just a stupid outlook.

CJ: How do you strive for equality in your everyday life?

MYG: Innately we all yearn for personal equality and acceptance. However, a constant barrage of negative comments and imagery can distort anyone’s understanding on how to treat others and even themselves. Personally, I stay true to my own convictions and openly express my concerns on issues that impede equality. Education on the subject is extremely important and in most cases allows people to reevaluate stereotypes they perceived as true. That’s why on August 26th my partner and I launched Real Heroines: an on going web project that compiles notable women who cultivated their minds and overcame adversity by defying social conventions. Through this site we hope to inspire female empowerment within men, women, boys and girls, from the action of their predecessors, so we can all move beyond gender stereotypes and grow as people. Education and an open mind brings awareness on equality, or any issue, really.

CJ: Growing up you were raised in a household that provided you with two different cultures – how did those experiences shape who you are as an adult?

MYG: I value knowledge and education and have a strong work ethic, but that’s more from being raised by a teacher and an engineer than being a second-generation Mexican-American. Growing up bilingual made me create a sort of pidgin involving a mixture of words and sound effects to express myself. Being the product of two cultures provides a perspective on problem-solving that neither culture might have on their own.

CJ: What is your favorite way that technology has changed over the past five years?

MYG: We’ve refined technology for so long that it’s much more accessible to individuals rather than only large corporations. This accessibility allows us to further integrate it into our society. An individual can now use technology to create something they’ve imagined with a degree of polish that used to only be possible with a team of people or large-scale machinery. 3D printing is a great example. And the whole thing is cyclical. The more we adopt, the more we refine, which in turn integrates it further into society.

CJ: What advice would you give to your eighteen-year-old self?

MYG: Take risks, stop waiting! Allowing your school curriculum to dictate your every move will only hinder your growth. Take the initiative to apply for internships, seek mentors, and invest in personal projects. These experiences will feed your creativity and raise your skill level ten fold before you graduate from college. Welcome obstacles that come your way and then kick them in the shins!

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Image: Courtesy of Moni Yael Garcia

CultureEducation

For centuries, poetry has been an oral tradition used to pass along ancient stories and lessons; poetry has been utilized to connect the present to the past through high-minded speech and rhythm. However, this elevated form of writing soon bored people, conceiving the idea that some new art form was needed to revitalize poetry. That reviver is now known as slam poetry.

In a lot of ways, slam poetry owes its creation to the Beat and Negritude poets whose devotion to the oral and performed facets of poetry led to the birth and rise of slam poetry in the 1990’s. Slams consisted of young artists competing for the attention and adoration of the audience by exploring political, racial, and even economical notions or injustices. Spoken word such as this has fostered a sense of creativity amongst writers while simultaneously keeping the public aware of current issues.

A slam poem that I find incredibly powerful is “Pretty” by Katie Makkai. Makkai explores the notion of pretty and the pressures our society puts on superficiality and appearance. She tells the audience a personal story of her struggles with her own looks as a teenager: she had braces, acne, and eventually got a nose job. By sharing her previous insecurities and her current regret for changing herself to fit societal standards, Makkai is reaching out to change the ideals we hold for young, “beautiful” people. Makkai exclaims how wrong all of this is seeing as she has not “seen her own face in ten years,” and explains how if she ever has a daughter who asks if she is pretty, she will respond by saying “she cannot be defined by five letters.” That she will be “pretty intelligent, and pretty amazing,” but pretty is not all that she will be.

Slam poetry, whether written or just listened to, can be an extraordinary tool for changing the world. By analyzing social issues, we cultivate attention for problems facing our world today. Also, by getting involved in art and in situations that promote intelligent thought, we are creating a brighter, more perceptive future for people. Check out Button Poetry, awesome website that has some amazing slam poems and slam competitions. Peruse them and learn things you might not have known before.

Image: Christian Senger